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VisionStorm

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The real tension in 5E is me asking myself is fuckwad going to be able to find the rule he's looking for on his 6 page character sheet before I stick a fork in my eye out of sheer boredom.

And the rub of it is that 5e is perhaps the most simplified edition of D&D in terms of core mechanics, with everything being handled by a single stat (Proficiency Bonus). But then they had use all that space they saved by loading up the game with like a dozen plus character classes (many of which are variations of each other), every one of which has at least two or more (usually three or four) subclasses, with tons of varying features each. And every spellcasting class has its own custom spell list, making it one of the worse editions of the game in terms of bookkeeping and the amount of crap you have to keep track of for your character, despite the core components of the system being so simple.
 

Mankcam

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You know how one of the great strengths of B/X is that it is an excellent template for genre emulation and "making D&D your own" so to speak? Into the Unknown is the same way. It's 5e stripped to the very core with some subtle but excellent changes to character abilities. For example, all the useless spell focus and common components are simply gone.

When I read the character classes I feel inspired to tweak those templates just like when I read B/X. Off the top of my head it took me like ten seconds to come up with a solid Assassin variant for the Rogue. I am thinking of doing a cyborg or lizardman race/class as proof of concept.
I also have Into The Unknown, and I am thinking of running another D&D 5E game, but this will likely be it. Covers that simplicity of B/X that I like, yet with the more logical rules approach of 5E.

It should be more widely known, as it’s a great version of the game, and should play pretty much how I like D&D to play.
 
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Mankcam

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5e without Ability Scores

When I think of D&Disms that have outlived their usefulness the first thing that comes to mind is Ability Scores. What's the point? The Ability Score Modifier is, in fact, the actual Ability Score since at least 2000 when 3.0 was released.

So like, what's the fallout if I just abolished the OG Ability Score and relied solely on the Ability Score Modifier? I can't think of any consequences besides a brief period of adjustment while players adapt to the new paradigm. Standard array optimized for variant humans grants a total of +8 points. Is there any reason I shouldn't tell players they get 7 points to distribute at character generation with nothing above 3 to start? With the option that they can put one score at -1 for an extra point somewhere else.
I remember one of the best things about Green Ronin’s D20 OGL game (during the 3E era) was that in addition to cutting down character class bloat, they also got rid of Ability Scores, and instead just had Ability Modifiers

The game worked quite well, and it’s actually a lot easier to conceptualise those core characteristics in terms of modifiers rathe than scores

It’s a wonder that True20 has never had a 5E update, it would work even better without its 3E skill bloat trapping.
 

Necrozius

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And every spellcasting class has its own custom spell list, making it one of the worse editions of the game in terms of bookkeeping and the amount of crap you have to keep track of for your character, despite the core components of the system being so simple.
One my greatest regrets is doing a multiclass Warlock Bard. Holy crap there's a lot to keep track of. It's a mess. I can't handle this much stuff, and frequently forget what spells that I have.
 

Mankcam

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Hey…I don’t want to start a new thread, so I’ll just throw this into the mix here:

Does anyone have any quick way to convert stats from earlier D&D editions to D&D 5E?

With all the D&D B/X, AD&D, AD&D 2E, and D&D 3E modules reprints available on DrivethruRPG, I want to cherry pick some classic titles to potentially run.
I don’t like some of the wonky rules inconsistencies of the earlier editions, and would prefer to run them with D&D 5E instead.
(Yeah D&D 5E is still a bit wonky in some of the under-the-hood areas like Feats, Paths, etc; I am more likely to instead use Into The Unknown for it's 5E simplicity)

I have been spoilt with the high cross-compatibility of BRP games that I can easily handwave NPC/Opponent stats on the fly.
These days if I'm not running WFRP 4E, I lean towards Mythras Gateway - using Raiders of R'lyeh to run CoC, or Mythras Core to run RQ - both would be a cinch by comparison with handwaving stat conversion.
I was thinking of going with Mythras Classic Fantasy to run Greyhawk or Forgotten Realms. However this will be mainly for my teen sons, so I'll probably still stick with D&D for simplicity (as well as hobby association for them).

I guess I can can handwave stats with D&D, but I would like to know if there are any rough ways to quickly convert AC, HP, etc between the various editions?
Or some good websites that have already looked at this?

This seems like the right thread to ask it in
 
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Brock Savage

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Does anyone have any quick way to convert stats from earlier D&D editions to 5E?
Here is the link. I have run many "classic" and modern OSR adventures in 5e with a minimum of fuss using the guidelines on page 3 and 4. Hell I also ported a lot of Call of Cthulhu scenarios, locations, and creatures.

It's easier to simply swap monsters for their 5e equivalents. If the adventure called for 12 giant rats, then I'd use 12 giant rats.

If there wasn't an equivalent it was exponentially easier to reskin and tweak an existing monster than to try and cobble something entirely new. Like, sure I could lovingly recreate a Star Spawn of Cthulhu from scratch but at the end of the day it was easier and just as effective to take the profile of a terrifying and mighty creature (gold dragon) and bend all my creative energies to a reskin and careful tweaks.

Edit: Same goes for magic items and artifacts.

One thing I will note is that in old school adventures Treasure often needs to be adjusted sharply downward. Old adventures handed out tons of treasure because the glacially slow progression needed ridiculous amounts of gold and magic items were the primary means of character improvement.
 
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Chris Brady

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WotC assumes that all players despised most of the Lord of the Rings.
Given the vitriol that has shown up from time to time, about how some settings are 'too Tolkien' or ripoffs in some sense, including the Forgotten Realms and Greyhawk (Accusations I've heard levied at them over the years), and all the forum posts on how to make D&D less Tolkien, can you really blame WoTC for thinking that?
 

Mankcam

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Here is the link. I have run many "classic" and modern OSR adventures in 5e with a minimum of fuss using the guidelines on page 3 and 4. Hell I also ported a lot of Call of Cthulhu scenarios, locations, and creatures.

It's easier to simply swap monsters for their 5e equivalents. If the adventure called for 12 giant rats, then I'd use 12 giant rats.

If there wasn't an equivalent it was exponentially easier to reskin and tweak an existing monster than to try and cobble something entirely new. Like, sure I could lovingly recreate a Star Spawn of Cthulhu from scratch but at the end of the day it was easier and just as effective to take the profile of a terrifying and mighty creature (gold dragon) and bend all my creative energies to a reskin and careful tweaks.

Edit: Same goes for magic items and artifacts.

One thing I will note is that in old school adventures Treasure often needs to be adjusted sharply downward. Old adventures handed out tons of treasure because the glacially slow progression needed ridiculous amounts of gold and magic items were the primary means of character improvement.
Thanks for that link, I'll take a good read, it's pretty much exactly what I am wanting.

Yeah I would usually replace any opponent stats with the current versions, rather than trying to convert in-game.
Retrapping monsters seems easy enough, I did that all the time with RQ, so I don't see why it wouldn't work with D&D.
It's just smoke and mirrors - it's really just getting the AC/HP/Damage Dice in the ballpark, so retrapping seems the way to go.

Thanks for the warning about the loot levels, that is a biggie that could ruin a game - monty hauls may have been fun in my teens, but PCs instantly buying everything in a town after one successful dungeon crawl doesn't sound like the game I want to run.

I'm tossing up between Low Fantasy Gaming and Into The Unknown - the first has the tone I really want, but the other is a bit more versatile being based off 5E, so it'll probably win out.
 

Brock Savage

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Thanks for that link, I'll take a good read, it's pretty much exactly what I am wanting.

Yeah I would usually replace any opponent stats with the current versions, rather than trying to convert in-game.
Retrapping monsters seems easy enough, I did that all the time with RQ, so I don't see why it wouldn't work with D&D.
It's just smoke and mirrors - it's really just getting the AC/HP/Damage Dice in the ballpark, so retrapping seems the way to go.

Thanks for the warning about the loot levels, that is a biggie that could ruin a game - monty hauls may have been fun in my teens, but PCs instantly buying everything in a town after one successful dungeon crawl doesn't sound like the game I want to run.

I'm tossing up between Low Fantasy Gaming and Into The Unknown - the first has the tone I really want, but the other is a bit more versatile being based off 5E, so it'll probably win out.
If you go with Into the Unknown shoot me a PM or hit me up on Discord. I'm working on a campaign using the same system and am happy to bounce ideas around and collaborate since we are both seeking a certain tone for our games.
 

Mankcam

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If you go with Into the Unknown shoot me a PM or hit me up on Discord. I'm working on a campaign using the same system and am happy to bounce ideas around and collaborate since we are both seeking a certain tone for our games.
Once things start moving in that direction that sounds good mate :shade:
 

Brock Savage

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Honestly, I don't think 5E was even trying to be a food and water resource management game at all. They wave a hand in that direction, but it's trivialized by any number of spells and class features.
Yeah Wizards really put the cart before the horse on this one. The massive popularity of "survival + X" and resource management among younger gamers tells me that Wizards misread the room when it came to wilderness survival and exploration.

I don't have a problem with spells or abilities trivializing challenges as the PCs level. D&D has been doing this since at least B/X and it works exceptionally well as part of a satisfying game loop (tons of video games follow this model). As players level, mundane challenges like finding food, water, and shelter are phased out and replaced with greater challenges as their capabilities increase. This is where a lot of DMs stumble and you can see evidence of that by the legions of DMs complaining about spells like create food and water or rope trick instead of upping their game by introducing new, exciting challenges.

What gets me about 5e's handling of wilderness exploration, foraging, etc is that PCs can trivialize those challenges from day one and break a satisfying gameplay loop that has worked for 40 years.
 
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VisionStorm

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Yeah Wizards really put the cart before the horse on this one. The massive popularity of "survival + X" and resource management among younger gamers tells me that Wizards misread the room when it came to wilderness survival and exploration.

I don't have a problem with spells or abilities trivializing challenges as the PCs level. D&D has been doing this since at least B/X and it works exceptionally well as part of a satisfying game loop (tons of video games follow this model). As players level, mundane challenges like finding food, water, and shelter are phased out and replaced with greater challenges as their capabilities increase. This is where a lot of DMs stumble and you can see evidence of that by the legions of DMs complaining about spells like create food and water or rope trick instead of upping their game by introducing new, exciting challenges.

What gets me about 5e's handling of wilderness exploration, foraging, etc is that PCs can trivialize those challenges from day one and break a satisfying gameplay loop that has worked for 40 years.

I was about to chime in to point out how these spells where always lower level, even in earlier editions, but decided to check my 2e PHB first, and holy crap! Create Food & Water required you to spend a 3rd level spell!

Back in the day characters in my games used to subsist on a diet of Goodberries. That one was level 2, so more quickly accessible. I still think that these spells kinda undermine foraging and the need for food, though, and they're somewhat on the low end. And Create Food & Water creates a crap ton of food—enough to feed three people per level for a full day (at least in 2e).

Edit: Still 3rd level in 5e, but Goodberry is lv 1 now.
 

Voros

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Interesting review from The Alexandrian on Call of the Netherdeep, which didn't catch my attention because the setting is from Critical Role.

 

Necrozius

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Actual quote from our Rogue (through clenched teeth during an unrelated, heated debate about the current adventure) : “I’d… rather… fucking… STAAARVE than eat one more of your wretched berries!” LOL
 

Baulderstone

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Yeah Wizards really put the cart before the horse on this one. The massive popularity of "survival + X" and resource management among younger gamers tells me that Wizards misread the room when it came to wilderness survival and exploration.
Yes, my nephews have been playing Minecraft all their life.

It's also much easier for a new GM to cobble together a simple wilderness sandbox if you give them some solid tools and guidance than it is for them to craft an epic, 20-level adventure path.
 

Baulderstone

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Why? Did they give them diahrea?

Druid: "Have some Goodberries, it's GOOD for you! It's right on the name!" *sticks a pouch full of goodberries right on their face*
TPLSX8.gif
 

Acmegamer

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Interesting review from The Alexandrian on Call of the Netherdeep, which didn't catch my attention because the setting is from Critical Role.

Started to read the article and unfortunately the video he mentions that was done by Matt Colville's break down of season 1 was set to private, which means I can't see that. I'd have loved to watch his break down of that as I find Matt fascinating though exhausting due to how fast he speaks. Someone told me to slow down the videos speed in past videos I've watched of his and helped greatly. heh. Now back to reading the review.

Edit: was a good read and had some good opinions and insights. Read part 1 and part 2, part 3 isn't up yet.
 
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Acmegamer

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I was about to chime in to point out how these spells where always lower level, even in earlier editions, but decided to check my 2e PHB first, and holy crap! Create Food & Water required you to spend a 3rd level spell!

Back in the day characters in my games used to subsist on a diet of Goodberries. That one was level 2, so more quickly accessible. I still think that these spells kinda undermine foraging and the need for food, though, and they're somewhat on the low end. And Create Food & Water creates a crap ton of food—enough to feed three people per level for a full day (at least in 2e).

Edit: Still 3rd level in 5e, but Goodberry is lv 1 now.
Even DCC has food & drink spell at 1st level, which my priest has.
 

Brock Savage

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It's also much easier for a new GM to cobble together a simple wilderness sandbox if you give them some solid tools and guidance than it is for them to craft an epic, 20-level adventure path.
It's also much easier for a veteran GM! Crafting a level 1-20 campaign that is gonna keep player interest for the entire run is no small task. Our last 5e campaign took 21 four to six hour sessions to reach level 6 (we wrapped it up at session 24). At one session a month that represented a couple years of play. I saw a spreadsheet somewhere that if a group played once every week with a DM who faithfully adhered to the encounter building rules it would take a little over a year to reach level 20. Granted, a DM can hand wave with milestone levelling but at levels 3+ players really need at least three sessions in between levelling to be meaningful and any way you look at it that's a lot of sessions.

I think the DMG in every edition could do a better job of explaining to DMs how progression works, how long it typically takes, and adjusting expectations for people who want to run a level 1-20 campaign. For some reason people push back hard against campaign with shorter arcs but through experience I have found my personal sweet spot is a campaign aiming to wrap up around level 6 in a setting where level 10 is the cap for normal humans. In 5e, level 6 PCs can punch way above their CR class if they go "all in" and use their noggins.

One good thing about 5e progression is that a new level 1 character can catch up quickly and contribute meaningfully if they join a higher level party (haven't tested this past level 6)
 
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Brock Savage

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To add on to my last post, assuming a level cap of 10, by level 6 I imagine a lot of PCs stop rolling in wolf packs of 4-6 to retire, get married, pursue personal or professional goals, build keeps and temples, etc. A party of say, level 8 characters working towards a goal would be extraordinary and something to be feared. It would also be like an All-Star team with a bunch of egos bumping against each other.
 

AsenRG

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To add on to my last post, assuming a level cap of 10, by level 6 I imagine a lot of PCs stop rolling in wolf packs of 4-6 to retire, get married, pursue personal or professional goals, build keeps and temples, etc. A party of say, level 8 characters working towards a goal would be extraordinary and something to be feared. It would also be like an All-Star team with a bunch of egos bumping against each other.
I'm pretty similar. For 5e, I assume a level cap of 11 and wind up ending campaigns at levels 6-8.
"Egos: the saviour of kingdoms":thumbsup:!

I mean, unless your setting has lots of high-level NPCs, leading to the "why don't they deal with this world-ending menace by themselves" problem, a party of level-11 PCs can well take over more than a few kingdoms:shade:.
 

Brock Savage

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"Egos: the saviour of kingdoms":thumbsup:!

I mean, unless your setting has lots of high-level NPCs, leading to the "why don't they deal with this world-ending menace by themselves" problem, a party of level-11 PCs can well take over more than a few kingdoms:shade:.
Right? In my estimation, legendary humans like Conan, Achilles, Elric, Thoth-Amon, Merlin, and John Carter are around 10-12 at their peak. In unlikely event that people of that caliber formed a typical PC wolfpack they'd turn the world on its head!

I find it difficult to wrap my head around high level PCs and a high caster population in bog standard fantasy games like Greyhawk and Forgotten Realm because setting assumptions break down. If you really wanted to do level 1-20 right you'd need an Exalted-or Godbound-style setting that accounts for PCs that are akin to superheroes and demigods.
 

AsenRG

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Right? In my estimation, legendary humans like Conan, Achilles, Elric, Thoth-Amon, Merlin, and John Carter are around 10-12 at their peak. In unlikely event that people of that caliber formed a typical PC wolfpack they'd turn the world on its head!

I find it difficult to wrap my head around high level PCs and a high caster population in bog standard fantasy games like Greyhawk and Forgotten Realm because setting assumptions break down. If you really wanted to do level 1-20 right you'd need an Exalted-or Godbound-style setting that accounts for PCs that are akin to superheroes and demigods.
You'd get no argument from me:thumbsup:.

Also, the only thing I really want from DCC is to specify when a PC can become a Patron himself/herself, and how that influences his or her dealings with current Patrons...:shade:
 

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You'd get no argument from me:thumbsup:.

Also, the only thing I really want from DCC is to specify when a PC can become a Patron himself/herself, and how that influences his or her dealings with current Patrons...:shade:
Hehe, go ask that on the Goodman Games Discord and see if you get anywhere.
 

AsenRG

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Hehe, go ask that on the Goodman Games Discord and see if you get anywhere.
If you mean that the discord users are unlikely to be charmed by the question, we'd really need a shrug emoji...:smile:
Yes, the notion that PCs can get figures of power is surprisingly unpopular among some old (and new) school fans. But my point is, if you gain enough levels, you should logically become one of those figures. In fact, many of DCC's Patrons seem to be exactly that - level 9+ PCs:wink:!
So the big question to me is simply "when does your Warrior become able to hear prayers in his own name":shade:.
 

Acmegamer

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If you mean that the discord users are unlikely to be charmed by the question, we'd really need a shrug emoji...:smile:
Yes, the notion that PCs can get figures of power is surprisingly unpopular among some old (and new) school fans. But my point is, if you gain enough levels, you should logically become one of those figures. In fact, many of DCC's Patrons seem to be exactly that - level 9+ PCs:wink:!
So the big question to me is simply "when does your Warrior become able to hear prayers in his own name":shade:.

Even those who work for Goodman Games tend to push back and concepts as clarifying rules. I've found their Discord irking at best and frustrating at worse. They're more of the hand wave it school of thought and think we all should be that way. That's repeatedly my take when I ask questions there.

I've actually given up asking them much of anything. I'm working through the some of the core mechanics to make a easy and dare I say consistent set of mechanics for our current game because we repeatedly find ourselves trying to figure out what was intended or even finding it.

It eats up a lot of time and breaks the flow when we don't know how some mechanics should go that we run across often in our weekly game. So yeah, screw those guys. House rules it is, fair and consistent. Also just because an rgp is old school, doesn't mean that the book has to be laid out badly.
 

AsenRG

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Even those who work for Goodman Games tend to push back and concepts as clarifying rules. I've found their Discord irking at best and frustrating at worse. They're more of the hand wave it school of thought and think we all should be that way. That's repeatedly my take when I ask questions there.

I've actually given up asking them much of anything. I'm working through the some of the core mechanics to make a easy and dare I say consistent set of mechanics for our current game because we repeatedly find ourselves trying to figure out what was intended or even finding it.

It eats up a lot of time and breaks the flow when we don't know how some mechanics should go that we run across often in our weekly game. So yeah, screw those guys. House rules it is, fair and consistent. Also just because an rgp is old school, doesn't mean that the book has to be laid out badly.
Shrug emoji it is, and here's my total lack of surprise...:grin:
I mean, those guys are emulating editions of D&D that expected you to get your own land and keep and lead armies at a certain level, and yet they refuse to see any need for guidelines for their Patrons mechanic. I really don't understand that train of thought, but I can either handwave it or set houserules with the best of them:thumbsup:.
 

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And the rub of it is that 5e is perhaps the most simplified edition of D&D in terms of core mechanics, with everything being handled by a single stat (Proficiency Bonus). But then they had use all that space they saved by loading up the game with like a dozen plus character classes (many of which are variations of each other), every one of which has at least two or more (usually three or four) subclasses, with tons of varying features each. And every spellcasting class has its own custom spell list, making it one of the worse editions of the game in terms of bookkeeping and the amount of crap you have to keep track of for your character, despite the core components of the system being so simple.
That is why I say that it is simplistic without ever actually being simple.
 

Brock Savage

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I am working on a Cleric template for a weird sci-fi fantasy Mythos game using Into the Unknown as a base. I'm am looking for honest feedback and not flattery. I am also looking a term to replace "Channel Divinity." If this post needs to go into a separate Into the Unknown thread lemme know.


Cleric
The cleric is a monastic warrior who practices sorcery, sworn by dire oath to oppose the Old Ones and uphold Law. In their ceaseless war against Chaos the cleric adopts many roles: fighting chaplain, holy knight, inquisitor, and warlord. Each cleric belongs to a monastic order, learning the mystic powers of sorcery through rites of service handed down over countless millennia.

At any given time there are roughly a dozen active orders devoted to Law, each with their own philosophy on how to prevail against Chaos. By necessity clerics are practical men and women and their doctrines reflect this- the desperate fight against Chaos does not allow for whim or flights of fancy. Some orders, such as the Conventicle of the Eternal Flame, venerate an Elder God as a powerful ally. Conversely, The Brothers of the Skull believe that man must overcome his cosmic foes without the aid of supernatural beings by developing his potential and eliminating the sorcerers who serve the Old Ones. The most radical orders believe that victory over the Old Ones can only come about by turning the power of Chaos against itself.

There is at least one order devoted to Chaos which follows a hierarchical system of novices, brothers, and masters based out of a great monastery-tomb inhabited by mummies.


LevelTitleProficiency BonusFeaturesCantrips Known
1stNovice+2Spellcasting, Monastic Order3
2ndInitiate+2Turn Undead, Focused Strike3
3rdBrother+2-3
4thBattle-Brother+2Ability Score Improvement I4
5thBrother-Superior+3Destroy Undead4
6thDisciple+3Channel Divinity (2/Rest), Blessed Healer4
7thKnight+3-4
8thCommander+3Ability Score Improvement II, Imbued Strike4
9thCrusader+4-4
10thMaster+4Timeless Body4

Class Features

1st Level Abilities

Spellcasting.
Reference PHB p56

Monastic Order
Warrior Monk. You are proficient with heavy armor and martial weapons.

When you use the Attack action, you can make one weapon attack as a bonus action. You can use this feature a number of times equal to your Wisdom modifier (a minimum of once). You regain all expended uses when you finish a long rest.

The following spells are always prepared and don't count against the number of spells you can prepare each day.

Cleric LevelSpells
1stbless, shield of faith
3rdlesser restoration, spiritual weapon
5thcrusader’s mantle, revivify
7thaura of purity, death ward
9thflame strike, raise dead

Martial Caster. Reference Warcaster Feat PHB p170

2nd Level Abilities
Turn Undead.
Reference PHB p56

Focused Strike. Reference Channel Divinity: Guided Strike PHB p63

5th Level Abilities
Destroy Undead
. Reference PHB p56

6th Level Abilities
Blessed Healer
. Reference PHB p60

8th Level Abilities
Imbued Strike.
Once on each of your turns when you hit a creature with a physical attack, you can deal an extra 1d8 radiant damage to the target

10th Level Abilities
Timeless Body.
You age 1 year for every 10 and are immune to disease.
 

Nick J

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Shrug emoji it is, and here's my total lack of surprise...:grin:
I mean, those guys are emulating editions of D&D that expected you to get your own land and keep and lead armies at a certain level, and yet they refuse to see any need for guidelines for their Patrons mechanic. I really don't understand that train of thought, but I can either handwave it or set houserules with the best of them:thumbsup:.
I'd contend that the design philosophy of DCC is decidedly not trying to emulate the domain-level play of AD&D and classic D&D. All of their supporting materials (modules and DCC annual mainly) are pretty firmly fixed on the PCs delving into ruins and engaging in picaresque adventures. Which isn't to say you can't do those sorts of things with DCC, but I suspect Goodman and his people don't much care for that style of game.
 

AsenRG

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I'd contend that the design philosophy of DCC is decidedly not trying to emulate the domain-level play of AD&D and classic D&D. All of their supporting materials (modules and DCC annual mainly) are pretty firmly fixed on the PCs delving into ruins and engaging in picaresque adventures. Which isn't to say you can't do those sorts of things with DCC, but I suspect Goodman and his people don't much care for that style of game.
Yeah, I know, and I suspect the same. But at the same time the whole of the OSR is about doing what you find fun, and I find domain-level play more fun...especially when it doesn't devolve into doing tax records:shade:.
So I don't give a whit as to what they care about. They're not at my hypothetical table:thumbsup:.
 

Stan

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Yeah, I know, and I suspect the same. But at the same time the whole of the OSR is about doing what you find fun, and I find domain-level play more fun...especially when it doesn't devolve into doing tax records:shade:.
So I don't give a whit as to what they care about. They're not at my hypothetical table:thumbsup:.

Plus, at some point, doing the same thing again but bigger feels silly to me. So, there are these god level monsters that never appeared until now so we have to kill them and take their stuff? At what point does your character stop to think that they could get a slightly better magic weapon or trade theirs for a castle?
 

Nick J

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Yeah, I know, and I suspect the same. But at the same time the whole of the OSR is about doing what you find fun, and I find domain-level play more fun...especially when it doesn't devolve into doing tax records:shade:.
So I don't give a whit as to what they care about. They're not at my hypothetical table:thumbsup:.
Sure. I'm just saying that complaining that a hammer isn't a wrench when you need to turn a bolt is kind of futile. I say go ahead and nick the rules from ACKS and you'll probably get to where you want to go (if you must have OSR-derived domain level rules)
 

Acmegamer

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I am working on a Cleric template for a weird sci-fi fantasy Mythos game using Into the Unknown as a base. I'm am looking for honest feedback and not flattery. I am also looking a term to replace "Channel Divinity." If this post needs to go into a separate Into the Unknown thread lemme know.


Cleric
The cleric is a monastic warrior who practices sorcery, sworn by dire oath to oppose the Old Ones and uphold Law. In their ceaseless war against Chaos the cleric adopts many roles: fighting chaplain, holy knight, inquisitor, and warlord. Each cleric belongs to a monastic order, learning the mystic powers of sorcery through rites of service handed down over countless millennia.

At any given time there are roughly a dozen active orders devoted to Law, each with their own philosophy on how to prevail against Chaos. By necessity clerics are practical men and women and their doctrines reflect this- the desperate fight against Chaos does not allow for whim or flights of fancy. Some orders, such as the Conventicle of the Eternal Flame, venerate an Elder God as a powerful ally. Conversely, The Brothers of the Skull believe that man must overcome his cosmic foes without the aid of supernatural beings by developing his potential and eliminating the sorcerers who serve the Old Ones. The most radical orders believe that victory over the Old Ones can only come about by turning the power of Chaos against itself.

There is at least one order devoted to Chaos which follows a hierarchical system of novices, brothers, and masters based out of a great monastery-tomb inhabited by mummies.


LevelTitleProficiency BonusFeaturesCantrips Known
1stNovice+2Spellcasting, Monastic Order3
2ndInitiate+2Turn Undead, Focused Strike3
3rdBrother+2-3
4thBattle-Brother+2Ability Score Improvement I4
5thBrother-Superior+3Destroy Undead4
6thDisciple+3Channel Divinity (2/Rest), Blessed Healer4
7thKnight+3-4
8thCommander+3Ability Score Improvement II, Imbued Strike4
9thCrusader+4-4
10thMaster+4Timeless Body4

Class Features

1st Level Abilities

Spellcasting.
Reference PHB p56

Monastic Order
Warrior Monk. You are proficient with heavy armor and martial weapons.

When you use the Attack action, you can make one weapon attack as a bonus action. You can use this feature a number of times equal to your Wisdom modifier (a minimum of once). You regain all expended uses when you finish a long rest.

The following spells are always prepared and don't count against the number of spells you can prepare each day.

Cleric LevelSpells
1stbless, shield of faith
3rdlesser restoration, spiritual weapon
5thcrusader’s mantle, revivify
7thaura of purity, death ward
9thflame strike, raise dead

Martial Caster. Reference Warcaster Feat PHB p170

2nd Level Abilities
Turn Undead.
Reference PHB p56

Focused Strike. Reference Channel Divinity: Guided Strike PHB p63

5th Level Abilities
Destroy Undead
. Reference PHB p56

6th Level Abilities
Blessed Healer
. Reference PHB p60

8th Level Abilities
Imbued Strike.
Once on each of your turns when you hit a creature with a physical attack, you can deal an extra 1d8 radiant damage to the target

10th Level Abilities
Timeless Body.
You age 1 year for every 10 and are immune to disease.


I'm not all that familiar with the Into the Unknown yet but I like what I'm reading regardless.Though when I read this first part....

"The cleric is a monastic warrior who practices sorcery, sworn by dire oath"

I couldn't get these guys out of my head...

1658620388318.png
 

Acmegamer

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Yeah, I know, and I suspect the same. But at the same time the whole of the OSR is about doing what you find fun, and I find domain-level play more fun...especially when it doesn't devolve into doing tax records:shade:.
So I don't give a whit as to what they care about. They're not at my hypothetical table:thumbsup:.

Add to that, you'd think for a Discord server that they would want to promote conversation instead of what feels like repeatedly shutting it down. I repeatedly see new folks come to the server looking for answers only to be stonewalled or given what feels like dismissive answers. That's no way to grow your game.
 
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