Gun Porn

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CRKrueger

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I have one of these. Just to elaborate, this is the Keltec RDB .223/5.56mm. It is a bullpup design, which means the action is behind the trigger. So overall it is only about 27" long, but is a full size rifle. It feels louder because your ear is right by the action if you are shooting from the shoulder.
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I want one of these. Simple 45/70 long colt. Henry listed it as suitable for hunting T. Rex.
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Beautiful rifle.
You mentioned “45/70 Long Colt”
.45 Long Colt is a pistol caliber. It’s the Colt Single Action Army caliber. A lot of repeating rifles are chambered in this caliber.
.45-70 Government is a big game/military rifle cartridge.
 

Bourbonjack

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Stored under favorable conditions, so moderately dry, room temp, basically forever. As long as the brass or steel casing remains intact the powder and primer will likely remain viable. Sure over time the rate of misfires may increase compared to factory fresh, but even that is probably not significant. You can still buy WW2 vintage ammo that works just fine.
I have some ammo that I bought 20 years ago, just stored in the factory cardboard boxes, inside metal ammo cans. Any of it could be put on a store shelf without raising any suspicion other than the 20 year old prices on the tag. That is of course stored in an air conditioned house, in a mild climate so it has had a very easy existence.

Even loaded black powder firearms are pretty durable. I know of a couple cases where people have loaded a black powder gun and left it loaded for a couple of years. They primed them and they fired just fine. Of course black powder requires even more favorable storage conditions because the primer hole provides access for moisture to get in.

Moist or humid conditions could be an issue. Like ammo submerged for years might technically be functional but if the casing is corroded it probably won't fit into the chamber.

If you are thinking about a post apocalypse situation, then assuming it isn't directly exposed to the weather and not in a really extreme wet climate, then civilian ammo stored in unprepared and as abandoned condition (no functioning HVAC in the building, maybe some partial collapse in other parts of the building, ammo in the gun, box of ammo in the closet etc), is probably good for a minimum of 10-20 years. Ammo in a gun safe with some precautions, like being stored in water proof metal or plastic ammo boxes with desiccant packs, I would think 50 years + would be no issue at all. Military ammo, sealed in pouches, stored in metal ammo cans, in a crate probably indefinitely except in the most extreme cases.

Spot on.
 

Toadmaster

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I recently came across some info on traditional military rifle proficiency through the ages, as well as a good video demonstrating the great advance the magazine fed bolt action rifle was over the most advanced single shot rifles in service at the end of the 19th century.

19th Century British rifle standards expected a soldier to make hits on targets out to 800 yards. The size of the target however did not represent a single man sized target, but rather a group of men standing in formation.

150-300 yards fire at a target 6 feet tall by 4 feet wide
400-600 yards fire at a target 6 feet tall by 6 feet wide
700-800 yards fire at a target 6 feet tall by 8 feet wide

Although the targets did have a traditional bulls eye and ring, this was simply as aiming point, any hit on the target was counted as a hit. I have not been able to find a standard of how many hits were required to be considered proficient.


Compare this to the US Military standard adopted in 1907 using a smaller bulls eye and ring type target, where the 10 or 12" bullseye (sources differ) was counted as 5 pts, a hit inside the 6 ring counted for 1 point and anything on target but outside the 6 ring counting as a miss. The shooter fired a total of 50 rounds (10 @ 500 yards, 20 each @ 200 and 300 yards) with a maximum score of 250 points being possible. Minimum for qualification being 190 pts (Marksman), 215-224 qualified as Sharpshooter and 225 or better qualified as Expert. This remained the basis for military rifle training through the Vietnam era and is still used with some modification by the US Marine Corps.

In the 1970s smaller human torso size (19x38") pop up targets were adopted by the US Army with soldiers expected to hit targets at 50-300 yards. To qualify a soldier must hit 23 of the 40 targets (including at least 1 hit on a target at 300 yards) with 30-35 qualifying as Sharpshooter and 36-40 as Expert.



While modern shooters often scoff at the incredibly optimistic sights found on many older rifles often graduated out to ranges of 2000+ yards / meters the tactics of the day did actually make this a practical feature with their being examples of serious losses being inflicted at ranges well beyond 1000 yards when used in traditional volley fire against troops organized in close ranks.

It was the change in tactics from the mass formations that dominated even into the early 20th Century, to the small units of dispersed soldiers that developed during WW1 that resulted to a shift towards individual soldiers as targets rather than large close formations. This change in target to a single man sized moving target that is trying to avoid being seen drastically dropped the effective range of a marksman to a maximum of around 500 yards.


In the video he demonstrates firing a Martini Henry, a single shot cartridge breach loading rifle which was the standard British infantry rifle from 1871-1889 and the Lee-Metford introduced in 1888 and the direct ancestor of the Lee Enfield rifles which served the British through both World Wars and beyond some still in use during the 1960s.

As with many of the early bolt action repeaters the Lee-Metford was equipped with a magazine cut off. When engaged the rifle was essentially a single shot bolt action, but when disengaged the rifle fed from the magazine allowing for a much higher rate of fire. The idea behind this was that when an enemy force was at close range single shot rifles could not develop the fire power to destroy the enemy before they were in close combat so at these ranges it often fell to the bayonet to repel the enemy. For colonial powers this could place them at a disadvantage as it removed their technological advantage, against the usually far larger, but poorly armed natives.

By engaging the magazine, a force could greatly increase their firepower for a short duration and hopefully break up the closing enemy force forcing them into retreat before they got into direct contact (melee).

In the demonstration he fires 10 rounds from the Martini-Henry single shot, 10 rounds from the Lee-Metford loading single shots, and 10 round from the Lee-Metford, the first 2 single loaded with magazine disconnect engaged, followed by the 8 rounds in the magazine (Lee Metford only holds 8 rounds unlike the later Lee-Enfields which held 10).

The ultimate development of the bolt action rifle was the introduction magazines loaded by stripper clips, which allowed for faster reloading of the magazine vs loading single rounds. The Lee-Metford did not use stripper clips although later versions of the Lee-Enfield used from WW1 onward did.

 
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xanther

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I got a gun question for y'all. How long would bullets stay useable sitting on a shelf?
Also consider the manufacturer, went shooting long ago with some guy met at the range, who had all this cheap (he called it cheap) surplus Egyptian ammo (9mm) it kept misfiring. The box was actually kind of cool.

After the third misfire decided to leave the range. That and his gun safety on clearing the rounds was abominable, he thought it was all misfire, not very careful where he pointed that barrel. Some of them could have been hang fires, yikes. As didn't read about him in the news the next day guess he didn't kill or maim himself.
 

Bunch

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The world’s only 9-barrel flintlock musket. 19th century. Museum in Krakow

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It looks like it has just one trigger to fire all at once. That's wild. I seem to recall a fair number of the large number of barrel guns had multiple triggers to fire a portion of them at a time.
 

Toadmaster

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It looks like it has just one trigger to fire all at once. That's wild. I seem to recall a fair number of the large number of barrel guns had multiple triggers to fire a portion of them at a time.
Probably has a rotating striker, so can only fire one at a time. That is how a lot of more than double barrel guns work. All 9 barrels at once would be interesting to say the least.
 

Toadmaster

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Kind of gun porn as well as a bit of the kind of things you might find in a post-apocalypse future. P-A fiction often grossly short changes humanities need / ability to make stuff to kill each other even under less than ideal conditions.

Less advanced nations have demonstrated an ability to replicate modern firearms using very primitive equipment, China, Spain (specifically Eibar), and the Khyber Pass (a region on the current Pakistan / Afghanistan border) are areas with a long history of manufacturing copies of modern arms. Note Spain and China both have had a mix of factory produced and "shop built" arms production. This type of manufacture was also common in the Confederate States during the American Civil War. Some of these are made in small machine shops but many were made by hand using tools of a type that could be found in your local hardware store.


Some Chinese Warlord era pistols (roughly 1916-1928)



A "Colt" pistol from Khyber Pass



Not always pistols, here is a bolt action AK



A Spanish S&W revolver (not that S&W)



A pair from Zimbabwe (and very P-A like)

 
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