Jackals: Bronze Age Fantasy Roleplaying

PrivateEye

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My hard copy arrived yesterday, and I've just started looking through it.

The setting is a nice change from bog-standard western-medieval fantasy, reminding me a bit of Glorantha, with enough to be interesting, but not overwhelming.

Stats are reasonably familiar: Strength, Deftness, Vitality, Courage, Wisdom and Devotion. The latter defines your connection to the spiritual world, and unless you are a Ritualist it starts at zero.

Skills are nice and brief - only 24 of them, and one of them (Ancient Lore) can only be gained in play (a bit like Cthulhu Mythos I think)

Characters all have traits (drawn form a general list and a cultural list) which in general terms allow you to roll with advantage where the trait applies, increasing the chance for success and gaining a critical. You also get to choose one of three virtues related to you culture, which you can call on to increase your level of success (if you can justify how the virtue applies).

I've only started to skim the mechanics and combat, but this looks to have significant differences from OpenQuest (as I recall it) - for example you have Valour points which soak damage before you start taking Wounds, and as well as Fate Points, you have a number of Clash Points which can be spent each turn in combat for a variety of effects.

I'll take a look at this chapter later today
 

Mankcam

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Hmmm I completely forgot there was a particular thread for this, and posted an Unboxing of Jackals here.

I pre-ordered a copy, and now that it is getting released I should have in down here in Australia in a week or two, although shipping schedules these days are a bit erratic. Given that Osprey doesn't provide a discounted or complementary pdf, I might just download it of DrivethruRPG over the next day or so.

Interesting that the core Characteristics are different from most BRP stat blocks, although the majority are still there, just in different names. At this stage I'm not sure what is the equivalent for CHA, but I guess they will have it covered.
Sounds some other rules changes from standard OQ, so it will be interesting to see what they kept and what they altered.

Jackals may be a good flagship for OQ, even if it is a big departure from the core OQ rules.
I'm looking forward to it! :thumbsup:
 
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Lofgeornost

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Agreed the art is spectacular. Design Mechanism is just feeding me awesome after awesome. And they just dropped that their releasing Mythic Gwynedd...I’m perpetually amazed that they keep tickling all my pleasure zones :pizza:
Really? That's great news! I couldn't find any mention of it on their website, though.

I had hoped that Vagabonds of Dyfed might have a medieval Welsh setting, but no dice.
 

RunningLaser

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The setting is a nice change from bog-standard western-medieval fantasy, reminding me a bit of Glorantha, with enough to be interesting, but not overwhelming.
A boon!

Just to add- Glorantha in brief is cool, not so much a fan of hyper detail.
 
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PrivateEye

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I think Jackals is based on OpenQuest (an OGL BRP variant).

As for the other Osprey games, I bought the PDF for Romance of the Perilous Land, and while the production values are nice, the actual system is just OK (a class and level system that kind of reminds of mix of various iterations of D&D with a little bit of Dragon Warriors thrown in). The setting ended up being not all that appealing to me. It's a weird mix; it assumes that Arthur and Robin Hood are contemporaries for example. I have no experience with Paleomythic.
Just as a comment - in T H White's "The Sword in the Stone" - the first of his Arthurian Quartet - Arthur is indeed a contemporary of Robin Hood. Merlin becomes The Wart's (Arthur's) tutor, and "In one of their excursions, the boys and Merlyn encounter Little John, who leads them to Robin Hood (referred to as Robin Wood) and Marian. Their extended stay with Robin culminates in an encounter with a griffin. Kay manages to slay the beast, taking its head as a trophy. During the fray, the griffin breaks the Wart's collar bone"

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Sword_in_the_Stone_(novel)
 

RunningLaser

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Just as a comment - in T H White's "The Sword in the Stone" - the first of his Arthurian Quartet - Arthur is indeed a contemporary of Robin Hood. Merlin becomes The Wart's (Arthur's) tutor, and "In one of their excursions, the boys and Merlyn encounter Little John, who leads them to Robin Hood (referred to as Robin Wood) and Marian. Their extended stay with Robin culminates in an encounter with a griffin. Kay manages to slay the beast, taking its head as a trophy. During the fray, the griffin breaks the Wart's collar bone"

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Sword_in_the_Stone_(novel)
It's a really good book.
 

AsenRG

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Just as a comment - in T H White's "The Sword in the Stone" - the first of his Arthurian Quartet - Arthur is indeed a contemporary of Robin Hood. Merlin becomes The Wart's (Arthur's) tutor, and "In one of their excursions, the boys and Merlyn encounter Little John, who leads them to Robin Hood (referred to as Robin Wood) and Marian. Their extended stay with Robin culminates in an encounter with a griffin. Kay manages to slay the beast, taking its head as a trophy. During the fray, the griffin breaks the Wart's collar bone"

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Sword_in_the_Stone_(novel)
Well, that's at least as historical as Arthur having a plate, so why not:grin:?
 

Voros

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It's a really good book.
Indeed, one of the best fantasy books I've read.

Speaking of which, any good historical or fantasy books set during the Bronze Age come to mind for anyone?
 

urbwar

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Gates of Fire by Steven Pressfield, which is about the Battle of Thermopolye. He also wrote Last of the Amazons, about Antiope and Thesus. Michael Curtis Ford's The 10,000, based on the writings of Xenophon are some good historical novels I've read. For fantasy, Harry Turtledove wrote Between The Rivers, which is set in a land similar to Mesopotamia. Stonehedge: Where Atlantis Died by Harry Harrison is sort of Historical Fiction, but could also be considered fantasy (since Atlantis is real in the book). Gates of Fire and the 10,000 were my favorites of the ones listed. At one point, Gates was supposed to be made into a film, but I think 300 killed that. Which is too bad, as Gates would have made an interesting film
 

PrivateEye

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OK, so I've read the combat chapter, which is interesting. I should say I haven't looked at Mythras for a while, so I'm not sure how it compares. However, this is what I've gathered from my first read.

All characters have a derived characteristic called Mettle (half their Vitality + Courage). This can be reduced by things that fatigue you - mainly travel (exacerbated by being encumbered). At the start of any combat you calculate your Valour, which is you Mettle times the number of unfilled wound box rows you have (max 3, so not too difficult). This would gives a score of 27 if you had a completely average human stat of 9 in Vitality and Courage.

Valour acts as a "soak" when you take damage, as you lose these before losing wounds, and they regenerate after combat once you have had a short rest.

Initiative is a fairly standard roll at the start of combat. In a round you can move and take an action, but importantly each round you also have Cash Points (which are kind of like action points). You can spend Clash Points for a variety if effects - minor actions like opening a door or retrieving an item from your pack, switching weapons or standing from prone, casting rituals. You can also use them to improve you combat actions (spent after finding out whether your attack was successful) - doing extra damage, damaging an adjacent target etc. Most importantly, spending a Clash point turns an enemy's attack into a Clash - you both roll combat skill and compare outcomes - this can result in one or both taking damage - if both score a critical, they will both take maximum damage, ignoring protection (and both gain a Fate point as well).

Armour protects by subtracting from damage before it is applied to Valour or Wounds.

After the fight, you may suffer a scar, depending on how many Wounds you suffered. The outcome depends on a % roll with modifiers depending on Wounds suffered. They range from minor scars (cosmetic only) through permanent impairment (a permanent loss to Mettle, Wounds, Clash or Martial skills). I see that the worst outcome is a severed limb - not quite sure how you would fail to notice this until the end of combat... Reminds me of Major Wounds from some BRP games.

I would like to play a combat in this system - it looks interesting but maybe a little more forgiving than some BRP games I have played.

There is a simple travel system - poor Survival checks will result in (temporary) damage to you Mettle (with consequences to you Valour if you get into a fight on arrival...)

Rituals - are essentially magic and each cultures has its own - a player can access the'r own culture's rituals (though they will have to travel to the appropriate place to learn them - for example the Luathi Rite "Balm of the Kahar" can only be learnt at the Temple of Alwain in Ameena Noani, or the Temple of the Morning Lord in Sentem) or Mouatheni rituals (evil and corrupting). Magic is generally fairly low powered (though you can learn advancements for rituals through the advancement system) but useful (healing, improved skill levels, protection etc).

I going to take a look at advancement and the chapter on the War Road (the main setting) next.
 

jay

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The wuxia game, Righteous Blood, Ruthless Blades uses a light system modeled loosely after the system I used in Ogre Gate (faster and involves less record keeping than Ogre Gate, more rulings over rules focus). It tries to capture a Gu Long-like dark wuxia feel.
Well hello....... Just bought a copy.
 

Mankcam

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OK, so I've read the combat chapter, which is interesting. I should say I haven't looked at Mythras for a while, so I'm not sure how it compares. However, this is what I've gathered from my first read.

All characters have a derived characteristic called Mettle (half their Vitality + Courage). This can be reduced by things that fatigue you - mainly travel (exacerbated by being encumbered). At the start of any combat you calculate your Valour, which is you Mettle times the number of unfilled wound box rows you have (max 3, so not too difficult). This would gives a score of 27 if you had a completely average human stat of 9 in Vitality and Courage.

Valour acts as a "soak" when you take damage, as you lose these before losing wounds, and they regenerate after combat once you have had a short rest.

Initiative is a fairly standard roll at the start of combat. In a round you can move and take an action, but importantly each round you also have Cash Points (which are kind of like action points). You can spend Clash Points for a variety if effects - minor actions like opening a door or retrieving an item from your pack, switching weapons or standing from prone, casting rituals. You can also use them to improve you combat actions (spent after finding out whether your attack was successful) - doing extra damage, damaging an adjacent target etc. Most importantly, spending a Clash point turns an enemy's attack into a Clash - you both roll combat skill and compare outcomes - this can result in one or both taking damage - if both score a critical, they will both take maximum damage, ignoring protection (and both gain a Fate point as well).

Armour protects by subtracting from damage before it is applied to Valour or Wounds.

After the fight, you may suffer a scar, depending on how many Wounds you suffered. The outcome depends on a % roll with modifiers depending on Wounds suffered. They range from minor scars (cosmetic only) through permanent impairment (a permanent loss to Mettle, Wounds, Clash or Martial skills). I see that the worst outcome is a severed limb - not quite sure how you would fail to notice this until the end of combat... Reminds me of Major Wounds from some BRP games.

I would like to play a combat in this system - it looks interesting but maybe a little more forgiving than some BRP games I have played.

There is a simple travel system - poor Survival checks will result in (temporary) damage to you Mettle (with consequences to you Valour if you get into a fight on arrival...)

Rituals - are essentially magic and each cultures has its own - a player can access the'r own culture's rituals (though they will have to travel to the appropriate place to learn them - for example the Luathi Rite "Balm of the Kahar" can only be learnt at the Temple of Alwain in Ameena Noani, or the Temple of the Morning Lord in Sentem) or Mouatheni rituals (evil and corrupting). Magic is generally fairly low powered (though you can learn advancements for rituals through the advancement system) but useful (healing, improved skill levels, protection etc).

I going to take a look at advancement and the chapter on the War Road (the main setting) next.
From what you have described, the Valour/Mettle system sounds very similar to CONAN 2D20's Vigour/Wounds system, except add Major Wounds table like seen in SB or OQ.

The regular refreshing of Valour will likely make things play far less gritty than classic BRP.
I guess this also will depend upon how Opponents are scaled.

Armour soak sounds pretty much like how Armour Points work in BRP (RQ, OQ, Mythras, etc). Numerous systems have copied this, including 2D20.

Clash Points sound like a cross between CONAN 2D20's Momentum Points and Mythras's/OQ's Action Points.

From the impression you have given, it feels like Osprey have used BRP (OpenQuest) as a foundation, and thrown in some nuts & bolts from 2D20. I will have to check it out for myself.

I really like the names of some of the spells for Ritual Magic, they sound quite evocative
 
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Lofgeornost

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Indeed, one of the best fantasy books I've read.

Speaking of which, any good historical or fantasy books set during the Bronze Age come to mind for anyone?
I remember reading a collection edited by Harry Turtledove, The First Heroes: New Tales of the Bronze Age (2004), which had some interesting stories in it. The one by Gene Wolfe sticks with me, as does one by Brenda Clough set in China.

The world of the Iliad and the Odyssey is of course Bronze Age, as seen through an Iron-Age lens. There have been lots of novels based on them. David Gemmell did a trilogy (Lord of the Silver Bow, etc.) which he did not quite live to complete--I think his wife finished them. My vague memory of the first book is that it was very much what you'd expect from Gemmell. I enjoyed Mary Renault's Theseus duology, The King Must Die and The Bull from the Sea, although I imagine their image of the Bronze Age is somewhat dated at this point.

Although it has a fantasy setting, I've always thought that The Tombs of Atuan does a good job in its early chapters of invoking a Bronze Age culture.

In the end, though, it's hard to beat the Epic of Gilgamesh for reading about the Bronze Age. I'm fond of the Penguin version translated by N.K. Sandars.
 

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Advancement is in two ways - Passive Advancement is based on rolling against a skill you used in a session - if you fail the roll you get an increase in the skill. The amount of increase varies depending on the current skill level. If you fumble the roll the increase is greater. As an roll of 91-100 is a fail you can continue to increase you skill beyond 100%

Active Advancements are handed out by the GM and these can be spent to increase skills, learn a new Rite, gain a new Trait etc. The GM effectively decides how many Active Advancements to hand out so can tailor the rate of increase.

Once skills are above 100% you can use Active Advancements to buy talents that enhance the skill - eg for Melee combat you could buy Disarming Strike, Piercing Thrust etc. Combat skills above 100% can be split between multiple opponents in combat.

After the rules section there is a Gazetteer Of The War Road (the main campaign area). This is pretty good, and again walks a reasonable line between giving too much or too little information. I have 2 minor quibbles about this section. First, there is a nice GM section containing "secrets" of various places. For some reason (with I think one exception), every area mentioned has "two great secrets". Why not three or four occasionally? Also some places mentioned (and containing secrets) are not labelled on the map - gah! Of course I can place them myself, but even so, when they are clearly meant to be somewhere (rather than specifically left to the GM to decide) I want them to be on the map.

I'm reading the "Running the Game" section tonight
 

PrivateEye

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The Running the Game section is pretty good - it gives some brief general advice, then deals with the calendar and seasons. It deals with the forgotten people of the lands, and towns and settlements.

There is then a section on Corruption - this can really cause problems for characters (for example mental and physical corruption and posing connection with their supernatural patrons) and lead them down a dark road. Atonement is possible, but only on a small number of occasions - and isn't easy to achieve.

There are the expected sections on light and darkness, environmental threats and detailed encounter tables. Thereafter the chapter deals with equipment, modifying it and commissioning it, magic items and treasure (mostly a "how to" guide but with a few detailed items. There are also guidelines on how a piece of mundane equipment might become "awakened to greatness" and start to become magical in its own right.

There is a fairly lengthy section on Kleos (essentially renown), the gathering of which allows greater recognition for a character as well as unwanted attention fro the forces of chaos. It also allows you to gain a patron (there are 5 pages of sample patrons to use) and to be a target for coercion/temptation by the forces of chaos, and subject to prophetic dreams.

You can also take seasonal actions, including atone, carouse, crafting or commissioning an item, increasing your Kleos, research, establishing a home, hospitality etc. Many of these cost money, but also give considerable benefits, including active advances, increasing influence etc.

Finally there are rules for retiring characters (as opposed to them dying in action) which establishes them as NPCs and allows the players new character to start with more experience than a beginning character.

I like this section - it gives a bit of a feeling of growth and continuity sometimes missing in an rpg, but without being as complex as (for example) Pendragon. Nice.

Next up is the Bestiary and encounter building. Again fairly straightforward - the creatures, monsters etc have their skills rated by group (eg Defence, Combat, Urban etc) rather then by individual skill - this makes it simpler to run them. Each also has different "combat ranges" - the GM rolls to find which range to use and can use any ability on that row or lower. An example form me here might make it clearer...

a wolf might: Snap, darting in for 2d6 damage - if the wolf does damage it disengages and moves away half a move; Hamstring - 1d8+1d4 damage - the target must then make an endurance check or lose 2 Clash Points and half their move until they receive a successful Healing Check; Darting Maul (3 attacks) - 2d6 bite (1), 1d8+1d4 claws (2), the wolf can move up to one quarter of its Move between each attack - if both claw attacks hit the same target, the wolf knocks their opponent prone.

The Bestiary is flavourful and nicely illustrated in respect of some of the fantastic entries (no illustration of wolves or lions for example)

Tomorrow I'm going to take a look at the adventures (three of these) but I won't give any spoilers
 

Lofgeornost

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The Running the Game section is pretty good - it gives some brief general advice, then deals with the calendar and seasons. It deals with the forgotten people of the lands, and towns and settlements...
Just wanted to say thanks for this read-through of the book; it's very enlightening.
 

Ronnie Sanford

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The Running the Game section is pretty good - it gives some brief general advice, then deals with the calendar and seasons. It deals with the forgotten people of the lands, and towns and settlements.

There is then a section on Corruption - this can really cause problems for characters (for example mental and physical corruption and posing connection with their supernatural patrons) and lead them down a dark road. Atonement is possible, but only on a small number of occasions - and isn't easy to achieve.

There are the expected sections on light and darkness, environmental threats and detailed encounter tables. Thereafter the chapter deals with equipment, modifying it and commissioning it, magic items and treasure (mostly a "how to" guide but with a few detailed items. There are also guidelines on how a piece of mundane equipment might become "awakened to greatness" and start to become magical in its own right.

There is a fairly lengthy section on Kleos (essentially renown), the gathering of which allows greater recognition for a character as well as unwanted attention fro the forces of chaos. It also allows you to gain a patron (there are 5 pages of sample patrons to use) and to be a target for coercion/temptation by the forces of chaos, and subject to prophetic dreams.

You can also take seasonal actions, including atone, carouse, crafting or commissioning an item, increasing your Kleos, research, establishing a home, hospitality etc. Many of these cost money, but also give considerable benefits, including active advances, increasing influence etc.

Finally there are rules for retiring characters (as opposed to them dying in action) which establishes them as NPCs and allows the players new character to start with more experience than a beginning character.

I like this section - it gives a bit of a feeling of growth and continuity sometimes missing in an rpg, but without being as complex as (for example) Pendragon. Nice.

Next up is the Bestiary and encounter building. Again fairly straightforward - the creatures, monsters etc have their skills rated by group (eg Defence, Combat, Urban etc) rather then by individual skill - this makes it simpler to run them. Each also has different "combat ranges" - the GM rolls to find which range to use and can use any ability on that row or lower. An example form me here might make it clearer...

a wolf might: Snap, darting in for 2d6 damage - if the wolf does damage it disengages and moves away half a move; Hamstring - 1d8+1d4 damage - the target must then make an endurance check or lose 2 Clash Points and half their move until they receive a successful Healing Check; Darting Maul (3 attacks) - 2d6 bite (1), 1d8+1d4 claws (2), the wolf can move up to one quarter of its Move between each attack - if both claw attacks hit the same target, the wolf knocks their opponent prone.

The Bestiary is flavourful and nicely illustrated in respect of some of the fantastic entries (no illustration of wolves or lions for example)

Tomorrow I'm going to take a look at the adventures (three of these) but I won't give any spoilers
thanks - it's a pleasure
I’m enjoying it too!
 

Black Leaf

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Just as a comment - in T H White's "The Sword in the Stone" - the first of his Arthurian Quartet - Arthur is indeed a contemporary of Robin Hood. Merlin becomes The Wart's (Arthur's) tutor, and "In one of their excursions, the boys and Merlyn encounter Little John, who leads them to Robin Hood (referred to as Robin Wood) and Marian. Their extended stay with Robin culminates in an encounter with a griffin. Kay manages to slay the beast, taking its head as a trophy. During the fray, the griffin breaks the Wart's collar bone"

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Sword_in_the_Stone_(novel)
However, I think there's a question there of whether it's to do with Merlin living backwards in time rather than Arthur and Hood being contemporaries. The Perilous Land is pretty much its own thing I think and meshes both legends together. I rather like that, but as we've seen in this thread that kind of gonzo approach to British folklore isn't going to be for everyone.
 

PrivateEye

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OK, so the adventures... there are three, which is nice (The Bronze Bell, The Lost Children, The Wolves' Lair).

Without giving any spoilers, they are fairly short, and reasonably straightforward. The Bronze Bell gives considerable opportunity for introducing some key setting elements and has plenty of scope for roleplaying/investigation. The other two potentially tie in to the campaign book (Fall of the Children of Bronze) which should be available later this year.

Whilst I like The Bronze Bell quite a lot, I would categorise the other two as "workmanlike" rather than anything else. My main beef with them is (for me) the lack of real roleplaying opportunities - they "feel" a little bit like early D&D adventures in some regards.

This brings me to my other personal issue - the supernatural seems very prevalent in the campaign setting. I don't have a particular problem with this as such, but there is a strong supernatural theme in each adventure, and personally I tend to like campaigns where the supernatural is rare - and adventures where there isn't any supernatural at all. In my book humans are humans everywhere, and there's lots of opportunity for greed, hatred, power play and petty rivalries to escalate and provide a good story without any need for the supernatural - one or more adventures dealing with this type of thing would have been nice.

Overall I would give the book 4.5 out of 5 - I would love to give it a go. Now all I need do is persuade the rest of the group....

I now have to decide my next big read - a toss-up between Aquelarre and Conspiracy X 2e
 

PrivateEye

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However, I think there's a question there of whether it's to do with Merlin living backwards in time rather than Arthur and Hood being contemporaries. The Perilous Land is pretty much its own thing I think and meshes both legends together. I rather like that, but as we've seen in this thread that kind of gonzo approach to British folklore isn't going to be for everyone.
hmmm. I don't own the book any more, but my recollection (and a quick look online) doesn't seem to come up with anything relating this to Merlin - he isn't actually on the quest, he just tells the boys to "walk along Hob's strip of barley" until they encounter something. This leads them to the Forest Sauvage where they encounter Much and Little John leading to the adventure to rescue Friar Tuck and The Dog Boy (one of Ector's servants) from Castle Chariot where they are being held by The Oldest Ones of All (faeries) under the rule of Morgan le Fay. So it's a right old mash-up.

Personally I like Romance of the Perilous Lands and think it is a good Mash-up along the lines of Dragon Warriors - though personally I would probably re-name Robin Hood as Clym of the Clough (who features in Dragon Warriors and was one of Adam Bell's companions, and might even re-name Arthur (following the Dragon Warriors lead, the analogue would be Vallandar (or Valdyne or Klavayn) who was mortally wounded by his evil half-brother Morgrin and taken by the wizard Mathor to sleep in a secret crypt with his 12 best knights to await the day when he was needed again (from the adventure The King Under The Forest). Of course even in Dragon Warriors Valladar and Clym o' the Clough weren't contemporaries! But it's fun, so who really cares...
 

Ronnie Sanford

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OK, so the adventures... there are three, which is nice (The Bronze Bell, The Lost Children, The Wolves' Lair).

Without giving any spoilers, they are fairly short, and reasonably straightforward. The Bronze Bell gives considerable opportunity for introducing some key setting elements and has plenty of scope for roleplaying/investigation. The other two potentially tie in to the campaign book (Fall of the Children of Bronze) which should be available later this year.

Whilst I like The Bronze Bell quite a lot, I would categorise the other two as "workmanlike" rather than anything else. My main beef with them is (for me) the lack of real roleplaying opportunities - they "feel" a little bit like early D&D adventures in some regards.

This brings me to my other personal issue - the supernatural seems very prevalent in the campaign setting. I don't have a particular problem with this as such, but there is a strong supernatural theme in each adventure, and personally I tend to like campaigns where the supernatural is rare - and adventures where there isn't any supernatural at all. In my book humans are humans everywhere, and there's lots of opportunity for greed, hatred, power play and petty rivalries to escalate and provide a good story without any need for the supernatural - one or more adventures dealing with this type of thing would have been nice.

Overall I would give the book 4.5 out of 5 - I would love to give it a go. Now all I need do is persuade the rest of the group....

I now have to decide my next big read - a toss-up between Aquelarre and Conspiracy X 2e
Aquelarra please.
 

Lofgeornost

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Aquelarre it is then - I'll start a new thread
Consider my breath officially bated. I will try to read along with you, since I picked it up in PDF last year but have not given it a thorough read-through yet.
 

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Reading the DriveThruRPG preview, it's interesting that apart from an acknowledgement of Newt Newport and OpenQuest, there's no connection to any OGL version of OQ, or Legend.

Thanks for the read-through @PrivateEye , it seems a lot like OQ with setting customisation across the board. Knowing Mythras, the "over 100%" talents seem a bit daft, in comparison to special effects, and the 'clashing' system reads fussy, but it might play out quite well.
 

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DESIGNATION OF PRODUCT IDENTITY “Osprey Games”, the Osprey Games logo, all artwork, and the trade dress of this work (font, layout, style of artwork, etc.) is Copyright 2021 Osprey Publishing.

COPYRIGHT NOTICE The introduction and fiction or descriptive text, and the setting of Kalypsis in this product is Copyright 2021 John-Matthew DeFoggi and is not open content.

DESIGNATION OF OPEN CONTENT Nothing in this book is open content OPEN GAME LICENSE Version 1.0a The following text is the property of Wizards of the Coast, Inc. and is Copyright 2000 Wizards of the Coast, Inc (“Wizards”). All Rights Reserved.

IANAL but why bother putting in the license if none of it is open content?
 

CRKrueger

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THIS LICENSE IS APPROVED FOR GENERAL USE.

PERMISSION TO DISTRIBUTE THIS LICENSE IS MADE BY WIZARDS OF THE COAST

Open Game Content may only be used under and in terms of the Open Game License Version 1.0a (OGL).

This entire work is designated as Open Game Content under the OGL, with the exception of those trademarks noted below under DESIGNATION OF PRODUCT IDENTITY and COPYRIGHT NOTICE.

DESIGNATION OF PRODUCT IDENTITY “Osprey Games”, the Osprey Games logo, all artwork, and the trade dress of this work (font, layout, style of artwork, etc.) is Copyright 2021 Osprey Publishing.

COPYRIGHT NOTICE The introduction and fiction or descriptive text, and the setting of Kalypsis in this product is Copyright 2021 John-Matthew DeFoggi and is not open content.

DESIGNATION OF OPEN CONTENT Nothing in this book is open content OPEN GAME LICENSE Version 1.0a The following text is the property of Wizards of the Coast, Inc. and is Copyright 2000 Wizards of the Coast, Inc (“Wizards”). All Rights Reserved.

IANAL but why bother putting in the license if none of it is open content?
So they can make use of all Open Content.
 
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