Pulp/Sf/Fantasy Paperback Covers

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Lofgeornost

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I know I read The Door into Summer, but absolutely the only thing I remember from it is part of the opening, which explains the title. IIRC, the narrator describes how, once autumn arrived, his cat insisted on exiting the house through all of its different doors, looking for ‘the door into summer.’

I’d never heard of that Plague novel. I appreciate the rat on the cover, but it should also be sick.
 

Nobby-W

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I know I read The Door into Summer, but absolutely the only thing I remember from it is part of the opening, which explains the title. IIRC, the narrator describes how, once autumn arrived, his cat insisted on exiting the house through all of its different doors, looking for ‘the door into summer.’

I’d never heard of that Plague novel. I appreciate the rat on the cover, but it should also be sick.

The story mainly involves revenge, incest and time travel, in no particular order because time travel. Aside from that, it's most notable for RAH predicting the invention of computer aided design, albeit in a very 1950s conceptualisation.[1]

1 - The story was written in 1956 and featured a robot called Drafting Dan. IBM brought out the 2250 (the first widely used vector graphic terminal) in 1964. The first computer aided design system on this platform was developed by IBM and General Motors about this time - the 2250 was actually a commercial spinoff of hardware developed for this project. By the end of the 1960s there were about half a dozen companies producing vector terminals of this sort. Systems that were the distant ancestors of today's CADAM and CATIA systems also came out around this time.

CATIA got its 15 minutes of fame in the 1970s as it was developed by Dassault and IBM (based on older CAD systems) and used to develop the Mirage 2000 fighter jet, the first example of an aircraft designed entirely through computer aided design techniques. CATIA is still widely used in the automotive and aerospace industries, although these days it has been ported to run on PCs.
 
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Lofgeornost

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Since I've posted about Zelazny's Jack of Shadows in the 'What We're Reading' thread, how about some covers? These are the Ronald Walotsky covers for the initial serialization in Fantasy and Science Fiction (July and August, 1971):

FSF 1971a.jpg FSF 1971b.jpg

Judith Loesser's cover for the SFBC hardback (1971) and David Freeman's for the Faber hardcover (1972):

Loeser-Walker-1971.jpg Freeman Faber 1972-crop.jpg

The Bob Pepper cover for Signet (1972), the version I once owned, and the uncredited Corgi cover (1974):

Pepper-Signet_1972.jpg Corgi_1974.jpg

Vincente Segrelles' cover for the Signet re-issue (1985) and Wojtek Siudmak's cover for a French translation (1978) from Presses Pocket.

Segrelles_1985.jpg Siudmak_1978.jpg
 

Lofgeornost

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So, some covers for Tanith Lee's The Birthgrave, starting with the original DAW cover (1975) by George Barr, the cover for the Gravidus translation by Ruud Bal (1978) and the second Orbit cover (1979) by Peter Jones:

Barr_DAW_1975.jpg HTGBRTGRFR1978.jpg Jones_Orbit_1979.jpg

I wasn't able to find a good image of the first Orbit cover (1977) by Gino D'Achille, but here is the painting minus trade dress:

Achille Large.jpg

Ken Kelley's cover for the DAW re-issue (1981), Michel Gourdon's for J'ai Lu (1984), and Vincent Gaigneux's for an omnibus of all 3 novels (2004):

Kelly_DAW_1982.jpg Gourdon_1985.jpg LSGDSTHNKS2004.jpg

The painting for the current DAW edition, which I have, by Bastien Deharme:

Birthgrave Deharme.jpg
 

Nobby-W

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The love that is not spoken of... Clown love. Gotta share this cover with one of my daughters, she hates clowns with a passion. lol. After all, doesn't everyone have children just to torment them?

Here's a couple of others you might impart as well:



Also, clowns aren't exempt from Rule 34. Just sayin.
Maybe I shouldn't mention Juggalos at this point.
 

Voros

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That Gene Wolf cover really misrepresents the stories within. I can't imagine what the person picking that up for the cover would have made of its contents (although I'm sure there are some clueless reviews on Goodreads that could give me an idea).
 

Lofgeornost

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That Gene Wolf cover really misrepresents the stories within. I can't imagine what the person picking that up for the cover would have made of its contents (although I'm sure there are some clueless reviews on Goodreads that could give me an idea).
Yes; I really enjoyed that collection when I read it decades ago, but that cover seems unrelated to it. This is the cover I recall, by Don Maitz:

THSLNDFDCT1980.jpg
 
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Sharrow

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The first cover posted is by the same artist who did the covers for the Book of the New Sun series for the UK editions, Bruce Pennington.
pennington-interview.jpg
 

Lofgeornost

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Today (May 20) is Gardiner Fox's birthday. I'm sure I've read some of his short stories--they used to appear in the Dragon, among other places--but I don't think I've ever read any of his novels. He wrote a lot, including historicals and 'adult' fiction, beyond his SF and Fantasy output.

Here's an Allen Anderson cover for Planet Stories (March 1953) for one of Fox's stories, a Frank Frazetta cover for an Ace publication (1964) of Fox's Warrior of Llarn, which seems like sword-and-planet:

Planet Stories v05 n11 [1953-03]_0000.jpg Warrior Llarn 1964.jpg

Fox had a multibook series of sword-and-sorcery novels about Kothar the Barbarian, initially published by Belmont Books. This is Jeff Jones' cover for one of the later installments in the series, Kothar and the Wizard Slayer (1970) and Maren's cover of a translation of Kothar of the Magic Sword for Mondadori (1990):

KTHRNDTHWZ1970.jpg Kothar e la spada magica.jpg

Another Fox series focused on Kyrik--here is the cover by Ken Barr for the first installment, published by Leisure Books (1975), and the cover by Attila Heija of an omnibus volume translating 3 of the novels for Mondadori (1993):

KRKWRLCKWR1975.jpg ufyvsinv1993.jpg
 
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