Pulp/Sf/Fantasy Paperback Covers

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Voros

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Oo audible might be cool.

Just added it to my Audible list, the reader Mirron Willis sounds good on the sample available, I find a good reader is really important for audiobooks.
 

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Just added it to my Audible list, the reader Mirron Willis sounds good on the sample available, I find a good reader is really important for audiobooks.

Just saw that the author (Charles Saunders) died last year, might give them a reread myself.
 

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Voros

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I had no idea that Carter was involved with an edition of Orlando Furioso.

I assume it's a partial translation; the Penguin edition is two big, fat volumes:

View attachment 29204

Not at all pulpy, but what the heck.

I think Orlando Furioso was the popular litetature of its time and so sort of pulp in that regard.
 

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I think Orlando Furioso was the popular litetature of its time and so sort of pulp in that regard.

That makes sense. I meant that the covers aren't pulpy; one is a detail from Paolo Uccello's Battle of San Romano and the other from Franceso des Cossa's April--the Triumph of Venus.

I like the Penguin covers better than the ones used by Oxford World Classics for their one-volume prose translation. They used to feature an illustration from the Codex Manesse, an early 14th-century manuscript of Minnesinger poetry. It's too early and too German for Ariosto, for my taste. Now they have an reproduction of Jean Ingres' Ruggiero Rescuing Angelica (1819).

Oxford Old Ariosto.jpg Ariosto OWC 2008.jpg
 

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So, to get this back on track, how about some covers of Chelsea Quinn Yarbro's alt-history novel Ariosto.

The 1980 Pocket Books cover by Don Maitz and the Tor re-issue of 1988 by Neal McPheeters:
Ariosto-1980.jpg Ariosto-Chelsea-Quinn-Yarbro-Tor.jpg

Two French editions from Denoël: the 1981 by Stéphane Dumont and the 2003 by Sparth:
Ariosto1981.jpg Ariosto Later French.jpg

I like the Maitz cover for Pocket Books the best, but that may be because it's the version I own.
 
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Nobby-W

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I'm sure I've read something by Chelsea Quinn Yarboro - maybe a post-apocalyptic setting where people can regenerate limbs. Can't remember the title, though.
 

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I'm sure I've read something by Chelsea Quinn Yarboro - maybe a post-apocalyptic setting where people can regenerate limbs. Can't remember the title, though.

She's most famous for her series of books about the vampire Saint-Germain, but I've never read any of those. In fact, Ariosto is the only title of hers I think I've read cover-to-cover, though I started To the High Redoubt at one point.

I think the book you read is probably her False Dawn, which sounds way too graphic for me, based on this online review/summary. To stay in keeping with the thread, here are some covers for it--the 1979 Pocket Books by Jim Dietz and the 1980 Heine translation by R.S. Lonati.

FLSDWNQWSV1979.jpg FLSCHDMMRN1980.jpg
 
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Tulpa Girl

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I don't remember regeneration as part of False Dawn - as I recall most of the mutations leaned toward the somewhat plausible - but it's been a couple of decades since I've read it so I may well be misremembering. It was a pretty dark read.

She also wrote a short story prequel that appears in one of her anthology books.
 

Lofgeornost

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I don't remember regeneration as part of False Dawn - as I recall most of the mutations leaned toward the somewhat plausible - but it's been a couple of decades since I've read it so I may well be misremembering. It was a pretty dark read.

She also wrote a short story prequel that appears in one of her anthology books.
I could well be wrong. The review/summary I linked to above claims that
one of the main characters loses his arm in a fight but it later grows back; this is part of his mutant nature.
 

Tulpa Girl

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Could be. Like I said, it's been a few decades since I've read it.

I think the female lead had something unusual with her eyes, like a nictitating membrane on her eyelids or somesuch?
 

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Could be. Like I said, it's been a few decades since I've read it.

I think the female lead had something unusual with her eyes, like a nictitating membrane on her eyelids or somesuch?
That rings a bell. I thought the bandit leader was growing his arm back.

Edit: It was False Dawn. I recognised this cover.

FLSDWNHWQN1981.jpg
 
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Voros

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That rings a bell. I thought the bandit leader was growing his arm back.

Edit: It was False Dawn. I recognised this cover.

FLSDWNHWQN1981.jpg

This is a good book. One of my fav 70s feminist sf books (but don't worry, it isn't politically dogmatic).

Tiptree is another favourite from that era, she did her best work around novella length, I think 'A Momentary Taste of Being' is her nihilst masterpiece. It can be found in this collection. 216319.jpg

Other covers of her collections.

cb78fe3b6f37fbfcff61a594b813d12f.jpg 5076b6b5b4649eabdf701f71340aa7aa.jpg 216317.jpg WarmWorldsAndOtherwise.jpg lf.jpeg
 

Giganotosaurus

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Alright give me a synopsis of False Dawn. I'm curious but don't have time to read it.
 

Voros

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Farmer in the Sky is probably my all-time favourite Heinlein. Most of the covers are rather boring and take the title too literally, the earliest cover is still probably the strongest.

unnamed.jpg

This was the one I first read.

830993.jpg
 

Voros

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My runner-up for best Heinlein is Time for the Stars.

Here I think my preference is for the second one, my original paperback purchase.

Again the latest cover is the most generic and uninspired.

Tfts56.jpg a43b9d7f08d16ca23febf49caff32c31.jpg images.jpeg 356.jpg
 

Lofgeornost

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Alright give me a synopsis of False Dawn. I'm curious but don't have time to read it.

This is the synopsis from Science Fiction Ruminations:
False Dawn‘s central protagonist, a “mutant” woman named Thea, is remarkably resilient. The novel stars off with her winding her way through a scene of incredible destruction caused in part by the Pirates: dead bodies, a raped woman splayed on a billboard, packs of wild dogs, dead animals whose decayed bodies show the signs of viral infections. Her objective: Gold Lake, where civilization might still exist. Her trek takes her across Northern California: a vast expanses of mutilated landscapes, dying peoples, and horrific surprises.

However, her solo journey ends when she encounters Evan Montague, the ex-leader of the Pirates. Evan is dying, his men, increasingly radicalized, turned on him and cut off his arm. The Pirates will stop at nothing to kill their ex-leader. Thea, against her gut feeling and desire to remain alone on her journey, joins up with him on her quest.

A third character “joins” Thea and Evan, an unstable man named Lastly who fought for the C. D. militia. Thea and Evan are disarmed by Lastly at rifle point and forced to march with him. Lastly lusts after Thea and rapes her as Evan collects fuel for their fire: no punches are pulled, the scene is devastating. Evan returns and kills Lastly.

As their journey becomes increasingly difficult for a one-armed man, Yarbro strategically has his “mutant” modifications manifest themselves: “Evan’s arm grew back as fall came on. It sprouted slowly as they left the contamination behind them, beginning as a tawny spatulate paddle below the angry cicatrix marking the path of the saw […]” (38). The majority of the story’s plot concerns the daily survival of the pair—investigating abandoned houses, building crossbows, avoiding the Pirates—as they make their way across snowy mountains towards Gold Lake.

The more thematic arc of the novel novel follows Thea’s slow recovery from the mental trauma she experienced. I found Yarbro’s treatment of the Thea’s extreme difficulty of recovery from such an experience is admirably conveyed and believable. As she recovers, Evan rekindles her memories of the past—they often reminisce about food, remember fragments of music. Also, she slowly begins to overcome the more general trauma generated by the virtual destruction of the world.

The end is bittersweet.
 
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