Real Life ‘Inspiration’ for a Cyberpunk Game

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Acmegamer

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If it's designed for the military it will be EMP hardened. On top of that it will probably have a certain amount of cpu/memory power along with programing that would allow it to operate independently of the operator for a short period of time. I mean our tanks and recon vehicles etc are built to handle NBC ( nuclear/Biological/Chemical).

Something that's always surprised me is that airplanes/helicopters aren't at least EMP hardened, civilian airplanes and helicopters that is. At least the last time I checked.
 

Nobby-W

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If it's designed for the military it will be EMP hardened. On top of that it will probably have a certain amount of cpu/memory power along with programing that would allow it to operate independently of the operator for a short period of time. I mean our tanks and recon vehicles etc are built to handle NBC ( nuclear/Biological/Chemical).

Something that's always surprised me is that airplanes/helicopters aren't at least EMP hardened, civilian airplanes and helicopters that is. At least the last time I checked.

Hardening electronics is not easy and comes with quite a big overhead. Everything has to go into a faraday cage which adds weight, and cold-war era avionic systems were surprisingly heavy and bulky. One of the more popular avionic computers was actually a 'miniaturised' hardened IBM system/360 that weighed about 100kg and is still flying on some F15s.

a4ksyhawkbg_33.jpg


That hump behind the cockpit was added to fit electronics - in this case a navigation/attack package originally designed for F16s and often retrofitted to later model Skyhawks. The modules used in these systems often have their own shielding, with shielded cables and connectors. It's all quite heavy.

Rad hardened chips also come with a hefty overhead and people used to build satellites with core memory and 8 bit processors like 1802s or MIL-1750a (a MILSPEC 16-bit ISA available in rad hardened versions) in an era when desktop PCs routinely had 32 bit CPUs. I've seen ads in trade rags from the 1980s extolling the virtues of core memory for aerospace applications. The RAD6000 CPU used in the Opportunity rover cost about $200,000 and was clocked at 33 MHz. A lot of folks flying cube sats don't used hardened components due to the cost and weight.

There's still plenty of '70s and '80s tech flying today - here's an F15C cockpit. There have been some digital displays retrofitted but a lot of F15s flying still don't have glass cockpits. I knew a chap who had a job programming a Ferranti computer flying on Nimrods for the RAF. That computer was built in 1973 and remained in service until the Nimrods were decomissioned in 2011.

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The F35 was kind of innovative in that it adapted fibre channel connections (which have a guaranteed delivery protocol) for use in its onboard networking. Before that it was all custom using heavy shielded cables, and fibre optic tech wasn't available in a usable form factor until the 1990s.
 
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VisionStorm

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Giganotosaurus

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AsenRG

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I was more referring to the fact that the kids are having to stay in a school to escape it.
True, but again, what do you think happens in cyberpunk worlds:shock:?!?

Also, the part AP reported, not sure if Reuters did: According to the UN, gangs are restricting the access of citizens of this neighbourhood to potable water and food.
UN agencies say it's too damn risky for them to bring help to the people trapped in the hood, which name translates to Sun City.

Still rings no cyberpunk bells:shade:?
 

AsenRG

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This is a depressing thread. But that just means we're doing it right.
View attachment 47982
I concur. About the only genre that's more depressing the cyberpunk might be "true crime", PA and horror...
...except, of course, cyberpunk often combines all three of the above, sometimes with hefty doses of antiutopia (which would be another contender, except it's not that popular in RPG:shade:).
 

MoonHunter

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Okay, not sure if this counts as "real life". It is more of an art piece that could spawn a chronicle.


There is a bunch of related media from the same channel.

It also provides the concept of "Corporate Superhero" with reality being very different from the comics/ cartoons/ radio show/ tv show/ and toys show.
 

MoonHunter

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I have a robot which does not make me quake in fear..

As the Human population ages, we will need more assistants. Simply oppressing other humans into servant/ slave roles may not be an option. Thus robots.

Note: One thing I have done in many cyberpunk settings I have done is had "a biologic disablement" occur. For example, SuperTetnus means any scrape/cut could be infected by this airborne disease (hence a reason for Cyberware as the only thing you can do for a case is sever and cauterize). There could be a disease or poisoning (such a synergy of various food additives) that weakens the population. Those that are rich, get assistant robots or maybe exoskeletons; while the poor waste away or use digital neural interfaces to do "computer work" on the virtual/net or running remotes. This is just an idea about what a house robot may be....


More info click here
 
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MoonHunter

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These people have too much time on their hands. Giving snakes legs.

Well, a lot of these silly experiments in robotics and prosthetics that we see on the internet are used to test techniques, sensors, and motors. So yes, a snake with legs prosthetic silly. That tool could be used to make pipe crawling tools for humans or depending on how the snake is triggering the motion, adaptable for a human motive device.
 

Godfather Punk

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A local news article is about a man who passed out behind the wheel, but thanks to adaptive cruise control and lane assist the car continued to drive on the highway for another 15 miles (only occasionally swerving or hitting the guardrails). After this the police intervened and managed to stop the car, but the entry protection systems then made it impossible to help the driver until heavy machinery could open the doors.

Not as spectacular as legs-on-a-snake or DIY railguns, but if you had told me this 25 years ago I would have told you that's some cyberpunk fantasy.
 
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