Swordfish Islands Setting

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Mankcam

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I know that I am late to this, but this Swordfish Islands setting looks really cool.

It's from an indie publisher (Jacob Hurst), so it may not be on the radar for many people.

The first book in the Swordfish Islands setting is called 'Hot Springs Island', and it's a hexcrawl sandbox setting, probably the most sandboxy setting that I have seen published for a long time

The premise is that it is a dark fantasy lost-world style setting full of savagery and weirdness, and the player-characters have embarked on a expedition full of peril, in game mechanics played out in a classic hexcrawl exploration situation.

It is set in it's own fantasy world, although this is only eluded to in snippets and no hard facts are explained about the rest of the world setting. It has been designed this way on purpose, so it can be easily plugged into a pre-existing world that a GM has already been running, or even potentially stretched to be set here on earth if you want to explain it away like a lost realm land with weird races and critters etc.

I think it works best in a fantasy world however, but not a vanilla kid-friendly fantasy; more of a setting for a mature audience, one with some dark themes around the edges.

The player-characters hearken from a civilised culture, and are basically playing a strangers-in-a-strange-land situation.
It is up to the GM to describe the player-characters cultural origins; it could be anything from an Antiquity-styled culture through to a Middle Ages influenced or a Renaissance-style culture, or even a Black Powder or Imperial Era / Age of Sail culture. The main thing is that the player-charactes are apart from their land of origin, and they are relying on their own wits to survive and prosper.

There could be any number of reasons for player-characters to make the long journey to Hot Springs Island, with the most likely reason being to loot it's ancient wonders of a fallen civilisation. Although it seems likely to be a costly exercise for freebooters to make their way to the island, so the island itself must be located some way away from the mainland setting in the world.

The island itself is quite tropical but very exotic and alien, as well as dangerous. Think of something along the lines of Madagascar, with hot and steamy jungles, exotic plants and animals, we're-not-in-Kansas-anymore kinda vibe. Then throw in the city ruins of an ancient Elven culture (kinda a cross between ancient Vedic India and fictional Melinbone). Overlay this with numerous savage beasts and non-human ethnic Races, each faction with their own motivations, and that is sort of the situation happening on the island.

The author suggests using his fictional Martel Company as a background. The Martel Company is described as a very politically powerful merchant league or guild, much like the historical Hanseatic League, or the East India Company, probably more the later.

One suggestion is that the PCs are privateers in the employ of The Martel. The company has outfitted you and paid your way to the island, and you owe them 20% of any loot you find.
Another suggestion is that you are indebted prisoners working off your penal sentence, and The Martel have purchased your sentence and transfered your indebture to them, with the time of this indebture being reduced quicker the more loot you return to the Martel Quartermasters.
In fact on the author's webpage he goes one-step further by suggesting that The Martel has physically branded you, burning a magical curse into your flesh. This curse is a magical timer which counts down your life, and this timer is extended every time loot gets taken back to a Martel Quartermaster, with the hope that eventually the tattoo-curse fades away before it consumes you.

I think that's a great way to kick off a classic hexcrawl like this, it's akin to the cool start-ups in Elder Scrolls or something along those lines.

This Hot Springs Island product is completely generic, it has no system or stats, but lots of narrative content and heaps of random tables and such.

Obiviously aimed more towards the D20 OSR crowd, but it can work with any ruleset, which I think is a feature, not a flaw, and I would be happy if more independent publishers went down a similar path.

I'm just wondering if anyone has had experiences using the Hot Springs Island setting?
 
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Mankcam

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Here's a really good YouTube review by Ben Milton on his Questing Beast channel.
Certainly explains it much better than I can

 
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CRKrueger

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Just thought I’d point out that while the Print plus Digital is $40 for the Field Guide and $60 for the Dark, the pdfs are currently on sale for $5 each. So for ten bucks you get the whole kit and kaboodle and can decide whether you want to invest in the print product.

Between this and Monster Island, my Hyborian PCs may never see the continent again, or want to.
 

Mankcam

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Between this and Monster Island, my Hyborian PCs may never see the continent again, or want to.
Those pdfs are going for a really good cost, $10 for both is a bit of a steal. However I think the physical books are beautiful, very well made.

BTW Monster Island is the only recent setting that comes to my mind that is comparable to Hot Springs Island, as least conceptually. Hot Springs Island has alot more toolkit elements than Monster Island however. Both are great sandbox settings.

Although I think its intended audience is D20 OSR, and perhaps D&D 5E, you can easily run this in Mythras, the grittiness inherent in a BRP game like Mythras will definately help portraying the sense of struggle and tactileness of this setting.

BRP Magic World sprang to mind when I first read thru this, it is just more in tune with the tone, and plays at a fast pace for BRP.
The other main reason I thought of Magic World was that it has very quick character generation rules for BRP, making it perfect for jumping straight into an open setting like this. Character background doesn't mean much in Hot Springs Island, it is all about what is happening in the here and now, much like a game of ARC.
So I would want to get into playing it quite quickly, and wouldn't need the background info that comes with other BRP games. Normally I prefer Mythras to Magic World, but in this case Magic World just ticks the boxes.

However Mythras, or any branch of BRP, would work really well with this setting. It is harsh and visceral.
I would certainly run BRP as a preference for this setting.
 
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spittingimage

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Those pdfs are going for a really good cost, $10 for both is a bit of a steal. However I think the physical books are beautiful, very well made.
In this case I paid for the physical books, and even though it cost enough to hurt a little, I have no regrets. Holding the book in your lap and paging through it is a joy.
 

Mankcam

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I have the pdfs of both books, and a physical version of the main book, The Dark of Hot Springs Island, which I bought late last year and I'm only managing to give it a really good look now. Beautiful production for an indie production. Yeah it's a joy to hold the physical book.

I am after the Field Guide To Hot Springs Island, but unfortunately it has gone up in price, and the aussie dollar has gone down.
Not only that, international shipping costs have skyrocketed recently. Trying to outsource it from Goodman Games and directly from Swordfish Islands currently costs about $130 AUD, that's far beyond what I want to pay and significantly more than what it cost me for the larger main book to be delivered.

International delivery to Australia is really quite high for some reason, $50 USD, so that's the killer. That's far more than what I would have paid last year for a similar delivery. But the other issue is our dollar is quite low at present, making that delivery cost come to $70 AUD on top of the book price, so you can see how the $130 AUD is reached.

(Good time for anyone from the USA to come down here for a holiday, your dollar is gonna get you much more than usual)

This year won't be a great year for me with those challenges, as the only reasonably priced rpg books will be those in the local aussie game shops, and they only tend to stock the bigger titles.

Sucks to be me :worried:
But I'll find some way to get it at a reasonable price, I always do.

I've got Contacts

My mate is a bit of a bruiser, he has an old seaplane and has been flying goods all through the South Seas ever since he got back from the Gulf War. Think Hugh Jackman meets Indy Jones. Gets himself in all kinds of tumbles and rollicking adventures, but if anyone can fly this book out past the current international embargo, then he can :thumbsup:

1548400636964.png
Rusty Morgan, All-Aussie Adventurer

(There, I just derailed my own thread with a Pulp Adventure tangent, heh heh :grin:)
 

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Edgewise

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I am after the Field Guide To Hot Springs Island...
I feel that this book is so much less valuable than The Dark. There are a couple of problems that stem from the fact that it is expected for this to be shared with players. First of all, the book has a lot of flavor text that establishes something of the wider world. Does your campaign have universities, banks and other such institutions? It does once you hand it to the players.

Second of all, it gives the players too much information. Depending on what you want players to know, it can be considered extremely spoiler-prone. There's even hints about the secret plans of the primary "monster" faction, as well as a complete explanation (lifted straight from The Dark) about the uses of all the various unique herbs of the island.

IMO it works far better as a PDF than the hard copy, because you can at least excerpt the PDF and thus control what your players see. In fact, you could scatter portions of the book around the island as a kind of treasure for the PCs to assemble, and thus create your own extensions of the book and the island. But the hardcopy is nearly useless IMO. Of course, if you're planning to run a Swordfish Islands campaign as written, it could be useful, but then again, how are you going to do that when Hot Springs Island is the only Swordfish Island to be published as of yet?
 

Mankcam

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Yeah reading thru the pdf i can see your point, it probably works better as scattered print-outs to hand the PCs.
 

The Butcher

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It actually did pop up on my radar over at G+ back when it came out, but I never did get around to checking it out.

I know that I am late to this, but this Swordfish Islands setting looks really cool.

It's from an indie publisher (Jacob Hurst), so it may not be on the radar for many people.

The first book in the Swordfish Islands setting is called 'Hot Springs Island', and it's a hexcrawl sandbox setting, probably the most sandboxy setting that I have seen published for a long time

The premise is that it is a dark fantasy lost-world style setting full of savagery and weirdness, and the player-characters have embarked on a expedition full of peril, in game mechanics played out in a classic hexcrawl exploration situation.

It is set in it's own fantasy world, although this is only eluded to in snippets and no hard facts are explained about the rest of the world setting. It has been designed this way on purpose, so it can be easily plugged into a pre-existing world that a GM has already been running, or even potentially stretched to be set here on earth if you want to explain it away like a lost realm land with weird races and critters etc.

I think it works best in a fantasy world however, but not a vanilla kid-friendly fantasy; more of a setting for a mature audience, one with some dark themes around the edges.

The player-characters hearken from a civilised culture, and are basically playing a strangers-in-a-strange-land situation.
It is up to the GM to describe the player-characters cultural origins; it could be anything from an Antiquity-styled culture through to a Middle Ages influenced or a Renaissance-style culture, or even a Black Powder or Imperial Era / Age of Sail culture. The main thing is that the player-charactes are apart from their land of origin, and they are relying on their own wits to survive and prosper.

There could be any number of reasons for player-characters to make the long journey to Hot Springs Island, with the most likely reason being to loot it's ancient wonders of a fallen civilisation. Although it seems likely to be a costly exercise for freebooters to make their way to the island, so the island itself must be located some way away from the mainland setting in the world.

The island itself is quite tropical but very exotic and alien, as well as dangerous. Think of something along the lines of Madagascar, with hot and steamy jungles, exotic plants and animals, we're-not-in-Kansas-anymore kinda vibe. Then throw in the city ruins of an ancient Elven culture (kinda a cross between ancient Vedic India and fictional Melinbone). Overlay this with numerous savage beasts and non-human ethnic Races, each faction with their own motivations, and that is sort of the situation happening on the island.

The author suggests using his fictional Martel Company as a background. The Martel Company is described as a very politically powerful merchant league or guild, much like the historical Hanseatic League, or the East India Company, probably more the later.

One suggestion is that the PCs are privateers in the employ of The Martel. The company has outfitted you and paid your way to the island, and you owe them 20% of any loot you find.
Another suggestion is that you are indebted prisoners working off your penal sentence, and The Martel have purchased your sentence and transfered your indebture to them, with the time of this indebture being reduced quicker the more loot you return to the Martel Quartermasters.
In fact on the author's webpage he goes one-step further by suggesting that The Martel has physically branded you, burning a magical curse into your flesh. This curse is a magical timer which counts down your life, and this timer is extended every time loot gets taken back to a Martel Quartermaster, with the hope that eventually the tattoo-curse fades away before it consumes you.

I think that's a great way to kick off a classic hexcrawl like this, it's akin to the cool start-ups in Elder Scrolls or something along those lines.

This Hot Springs Island product is completely generic, it has no system or stats, but lots of narrative content and heaps of random tables and such.

Obiviously aimed more towards the D20 OSR crowd, but it can work with any ruleset, which I think is a feature, not a flaw, and I would be happy if more independent publishers went down a similar path.

I'm just wondering if anyone has had experiences using the Hot Springs Island setting?

Damn, this sounds fun. You may have sold a copy.

Just thought I’d point out that while the Print plus Digital is $40 for the Field Guide and $60 for the Dark, the pdfs are currently on sale for $5 each. So for ten bucks you get the whole kit and kaboodle and can decide whether you want to invest in the print product.

Between this and Monster Island, my Hyborian PCs may never see the continent again, or want to.

"OSR Monster Island" was pretty much what I thought upon reading the OP.
 

Simon Hogwood

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(There, I just derailed my own thread with a Pulp Adventure tangent, heh heh :grin:)
Well, it wouldn't be impossible to strand a seaplane or tramp steamer full of tommy-gun wielding pulp archetypes on Hot Springs Island. Either they fell through a dimensional rift, or the inhabitants of the island came through one (if the latter, you may want to consider walling the island off with a perpetual storm ala the most recent Kong movie).

You can, by the way, count me among those waiting to see the rest of the archipelago.
 

Voros

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I bought most of Jacob Hurst's zines back when he was just releasing them on Etsy of all places. How could I not checkout a zine called Toxic Elven Smut? He has folded all the material from the early zines into the Dark. I've got all the Hot Springs Island books on pdf via a charity Bundle and it is great but I do kinda miss the concise and manageable presentation of a smaller zine.
 

Nobby-W

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[ . . . ]
Sucks to be me :worried:
I feel your pain. The supply chain for books and software down under is diabolical. We used to get it in NZ - even worse really as most stuff got shipped via Oz. At one point it was cheaper to fly to America, buy Adobe Creative Suite there and return to Australia than to buy it there. Now I've moved to Blighty this is more or less a non-issue, although shipping across the Atlantic can still cost a bit.

Maybe one of the Merkins on this board would be up to act as a local shipping destination and then just post it on to you. You can reimburse them with Paypal.
 

Mankcam

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I feel your pain. The supply chain for books and software down under is diabolical. We used to get it in NZ - even worse really as most stuff got shipped via Oz. At one point it was cheaper to fly to America, buy Adobe Creative Suite there and return to Australia than to buy it there.
Sucks to be us wild colonial boys, heh heh
 
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Yep, got the Hot Springs Islands books as PDFs (just gotta save up until I can afford hard-copies), great example of a self-contained hexcrawl :smile:
 

3rik

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I´ve been eyeballing the Hot Springs Island books and wondering if I "need" both books or just the main one. Also, because they are quite costly, I would feel kind of cautious about actually using it at the game table but I'd need to print out the whole pdf if I don't want to. I mean, with this kind of sandbox setting you really need to run it from the book, right?
 

spittingimage

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I´ve been eyeballing the Hot Springs Island books and wondering if I "need" both books or just the main one. Also, because they are quite costly, I would feel kind of cautious about actually using it at the game table but I'd need to print out the whole pdf if I don't want to. I mean, with this kind of sandbox setting you really need to run it from the book, right?
The main one is fine. The second one is a 'guide book' you can give the players to consult during the game. It's a prop to make them feel like they're in partially-explored territory.
 

Edgewise

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The second one is a 'guide book' you can give the players to consult during the game. It's a prop to make them feel like they're in partially-explored territory.
I'll add that I think the "player" book (i.e. the Field Guide) is of very limited usefulness. It reveals a lot of stuff about the setting that you might not want to leak in one big drop. It also has in-world fiction and stuff like that that references a broader setting, so that makes it a little trickier to fit the text into your own campaign.

Of course, Hurst is intending to one day release all the Swordfish Islands, of which Hot Springs is only supposed to be the first. Sounds ambitious. I'm just glad for HSI, as it is awesome. I'm not going to hold my breath for the Swordfish Island 'Verse, however.
 

Ronnie Sanford

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Just thought I’d point out that while the Print plus Digital is $40 for the Field Guide and $60 for the Dark, the pdfs are currently on sale for $5 each. So for ten bucks you get the whole kit and kaboodle and can decide whether you want to invest in the print product.

Between this and Monster Island, my Hyborian PCs may never see the continent again, or want to.
On that note... Yesterday two of my players asked for a new campaign. We discussed Aquelarra (spic?) and they were interested but I know in their hearts there really more into high fantasy so I am looking around. On the one hand there is Monster Island which has good reviews and then there is Swordfish Island which seems interesting. Bearing in mind that we will use the setting with BRP and like rational (everything has a purpose) settings and the fact that none of us like anything to gonzo which would you pick?
 

Edgewise

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Bearing in mind that we will use the setting with BRP and like rational (everything has a purpose) settings and the fact that none of us like anything to gonzo which would you pick?
It's very logical but it's also fairly gonzo, so it's kind of hard to say how you'll like it. I think it's just really high-quality adventure material, so if you're on the edge, I'd give it a gander.
 

Ronnie Sanford

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Those pdfs are going for a really good cost, $10 for both is a bit of a steal. However I think the physical books are beautiful, very well made.

BTW Monster Island is the only recent setting that comes to my mind that is comparable to Hot Springs Island, as least conceptually. Hot Springs Island has alot more toolkit elements than Monster Island however. Both are great sandbox settings.

Although I think its intended audience is D20 OSR, and perhaps D&D 5E, you can easily run this in Mythras, the grittiness inherent in a BRP game like Mythras will definately help portraying the sense of struggle and tactileness of this setting.

BRP Magic World sprang to mind when I first read thru this, it is just more in tune with the tone, and plays at a fast pace for BRP.
The other main reason I thought of Magic World was that it has very quick character generation rules for BRP, making it perfect for jumping straight into an open setting like this. Character background doesn't mean much in Hot Springs Island, it is all about what is happening in the here and now, much like a game of ARC.
So I would want to get into playing it quite quickly, and wouldn't need the background info that comes with other BRP games. Normally I prefer Mythras to Magic World, but in this case Magic World just ticks the boxes.

However Mythras, or any branch of BRP, would work really well with this setting. It is harsh and visceral.
I would certainly run BRP as a preference for this setting.
Okay so assume I play Swordfish Island with Magic World (which is my default anyway), you mention Swordfish has a better toolbox than Monster Island, what are you referring to? Monster Island comes out of the box with three settlements (though they suggest more can easily be created). How many settlements are detailed In Swordfish? Also I understand that Swordfish is a hex crawl, is Monster Island also a hex crawl? And finally I know that a range of skills are often useful in TDM products (which I like), is that true of Swordfish or is Swordfish mostly about fighting?
 
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Ronnie Sanford

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Okay so assume I play Swordfish Island with Magic World (which is my default anyway), you mention Swordfish has a better toolbox than Monster Island, what are you referring to? Monster Island comes out of the box with three settlements (though they suggest more can easily be created). How many settlements are detailed I. Swordfish? Also I understand that Swordfish is a hex crawl, is Monster Island also a hex crawl? And finally I know that a range of skills are often useful in TDM products (which I like), is that true of Swordfish or is Swordfish mostly about fighting?
Can the gonzo elements be easily ignored or are they baked into the story?
 

Mankcam

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Okay so assume I play Swordfish Island with Magic World (which is my default anyway), you mention Swordfish has a better toolbox than Monster Island, what are you referring to? Monster Island comes out of the box with three settlements (though they suggest more can easily be created). How many settlements are detailed I. Swordfish? Also I understand that Swordfish is a hex crawl, is Monster Island also a hex crawl? And finally I know that a range of skills are often useful in TDM products (which I like), is that true of Swordfish or is Swordfish mostly about fighting?
Monster Island is really good, and these products scratch a different itch to some extent, although they are both great encapsulated 'lost island' settings.

Swordfish Islands: The Dark of Hot Springs Island has 3 settlements, and describes five competing factions baked in, and it's very much an open hex crawl.
It is also much more sandbox, and has 20 or more different maps or detailed events.
And it is definately a hexcrawl.

Monster Island has much less content like this, and isn't a hexcrawl.
It is also a really good open setting however, with lots of scope and utility.

Regarding Swordfish, it is probably created with D&D OSR in mind, and could easily be a quite deadly meatgrinder.
However there is nothing stopping PCs using negotation and diplomacy to get around many of the challenges.
I guess there are no stats, so you use whatever system you want for it, and stat NPCs accordingly.
So it's more for GMs who like to tinker with stats etc, and I think BRP Magic World would be a great fit for it.

Swordfish could be a challenge to run however, as it is a hexcrawl, and a very open sandbox. In many ways the GM is discovering things alongside the PCs, whereas in Monster Island the setting doesn't have the same ammount of random elements, the GM will more or less know what's going on in what region before dice starts rolling.

It's hard to recommend one over the other, it depends on how you want to GM.
I really am quite interested in trying out Swordfish as a hexcrawl, mainly because I have never ran a classic hexcrawl before.

Both Swordfish and Monster Island are pretty good, one is a hex crawl whilst the other isn't; and that element really decides on which one you may wish to pursue.

Both are great resources to have :thumbsup:
 
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3rik

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I have never ran a hexcrawl. Period.

I would like to give it a try but on the other hand it seems like it could become tedious and you'd have to refer to the descriptions in the book all the time.
 

Ronnie Sanford

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Monster Island is really good, and these products scratch a different itch to some extent, although they are both great encapsulated 'lost island' settings.

Swordfish Islands: The Dark of Hot Springs Island has 3 settlements, and describes five competing factions baked in, and it's very much an open hex crawl.
It is also much more sandbox, and has 20 or more different maps or detailed events.
And it is definately a hexcrawl.

Monster Island has much less content like this, and isn't a hexcrawl.
It is also a really good open setting however, with lots of scope and utility.

Regarding Swordfish, it is probably created with D&D OSR in mind, and could easily be a quite deadly meatgrinder.
However there is nothing stopping PCs using negotation and diplomacy to get around many of the challenges.
I guess there are no stats, so you use whatever system you want for it, and stat NPCs accordingly.
So it's more for GMs who like to tinker with stats etc, and I think BRP Magic World would be a great fit for it.

Swordfish could be a challenge to run however, as it is a hexcrawl, and a very open sandbox. In many ways the GM is discovering things alongside the PCs, whereas in Monster Island the setting doesn't have the same ammount of random elements, the GM will more or less know what's going on in what region before dice starts rolling.

It's hard to recommend one over the other, it depends on how you want to GM.
I really am quite interested in trying out Swordfish as a hexcrawl, mainly because I have never ran a classic hexcrawl before.

Both Swordfish and Monster Island are pretty good, one is a hex crawl whilst the other isn't; and that element really decides on which one you may wish to pursue.

Both are great resources to have :thumbsup:
Thanks for the great information but I am having a hard time with the decision. It seems like Monster Island might be a better fit for me if only because its less work and probably more in line with what typical D100 GMs play. As flawless as Swordfish Island appears I am worried that I might not could do it justice (as there is a lot of real-time creation that goes on). On the other hand Swordfish Island seems like a MUST buy. I am going to read some more reviews on Monster Island and Swordfish Island but I think the answer is to run them both back to back and see which the party likes better.
 
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Mankcam

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From the blurb:

----
The Legend
Long ago, when the world was new an elf king was banished and tossed into the sea. His hatred was so great, and so cold, that it froze the water into a spire of ice and he was cursed to drift forever, bringing winter to the world.
But sometimes, he hungers for the blood of bad children.
And on nights, when the fog is thick, and the ice piles up in jagged sheets upon the shore, he sends his wives to steal away crying babies, and the kinds of children that fight and do not do as they’re told.
So beware sweet voices in the fog, and stay close to the fire, or be carried off howling, to The Frost Spire...

The Frost Spire
The Frost Spire is a winter themed adventure for old school RPGs and players of approximately 3rd level.

Morrigan, the 7777th child of the Fairy King of Winter has been tasked with claiming (i.e., kidnapping) children of great innate magical power and sending them to the Winter Court for training in the magical arts.
The adventure can easily be played as a straight dungeon crawl.
However, because the Frost Spire is part of the fey realms, time moves strangely within it, and the dungeon can serve as a way to transition a campaign through time and space. Additionally, although Morrigan is kidnapping children, if they are left untrained their unchecked magical skills will threaten the very fabric of reality.
Because of this, the adventure can also be resolved almost completely socially with focus on grey morality and tough choices.

----

Sounds really cool, some very dark fable qualities going on here
 
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Rob Necronomicon

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From the blurb:

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The Legend
Long ago, when the world was new an elf king was banished and tossed into the sea. His hatred was so great, and so cold, that it froze the water into a spire of ice and he was cursed to drift forever, bringing winter to the world.
But sometimes, he hungers for the blood of bad children.
And on nights, when the fog is thick, and the ice piles up in jagged sheets upon the shore, he sends his wives to steal away crying babies, and the kinds of children that fight and do not do as they’re told.
So beware sweet voices in the fog, and stay close to the fire, or be carried off howling, to The Frost Spire...
The Frost Spire
The Frost Spire is a winter themed adventure for old school RPGs and players of approximately 3rd level.

Morrigan, the 7777th child of the Fairy King of Winter has been tasked with claiming (i.e., kidnapping) children of great innate magical power and sending them to the Winter Court for training in the magical arts.
The adventure can easily be played as a straight dungeon crawl.
However, because the Frost Spire is part of the fey realms, time moves strangely within it, and the dungeon can serve as a way to transition a campaign through time and space. Additionally, although Morrigan is kidnapping children, if they are left untrained their unchecked magical skills will threaten the very fabric of reality.
Because of this, the adventure can also be resolved almost completely socially with focus on grey morality and tough choices.

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Sounds really cool, some very dark fable qualities going on here

I thought it sounded cool as well. Next payday I'll pick up a few of his games.
 
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