The Food and Drink Thread

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Agemegos

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I'm baking my own bread because everything in Sweden, including the bread, is waaay too salty for me. Usually bread recipes are supposed to be followed to the gram (use a scale, not a volume measure!), but I needed a comparably healthy bread recipe for lazy incompetents: ridiculously simple and very forgiving. This is what I came up with.
  1. Mix 1 kg of whole wheat flour with 14 g of dry yeast and two or three pinches of salt in a big bowl. (Here, this means buying one pack of flour and two packs of yeast and just putting it all in).
  2. Let sit for ten minutes (to activate the yeast, apparently; that's what it said on the package)
  3. Add 600 ml of a 1:1 water-milk (or water-soy milk) mixture.
Add the water before you let it sit to activate the yeast.
 

thesheeep

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Thanks! Can I sub garlic power for garlic clove?
I don't know, man.
Seems fishy....

s-l640.jpg
 

zanshin

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Artery Furring Stilton and Walnut Pate

8 oz Stilton (or other hard blue cheese)
8 oz Walnut pieces (halves are fine, but need more chopping)
8 oz Full fat cream cheese
2 dessert spoonfulls of mayonnaise (full fat, I mean low fat seems a bit pointless at this point)
1 dollop of single cream

Grate the stilton
Chop the walnuts into small pieces 5mm or so.

Use a fork to mix the stilton and walnuts.

Add cream cheese and mix thoroughly.

Add mayonnaise and mix thoroughly

Dollop on cream and mix. Texture should be semi firm, slightly more viscous than cream cheese.

Ready to serve; ideal on toast, bread, crisps, or with celery or batons of raw pepper or carrot if you want to fool yourself you are being healthy.

This has been a feature at friends and family events for years. No heart attacks yet...
 

Nobby-W

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Artery Furring Stilton and Walnut Pate

8 oz Stilton (or other hard blue cheese)
8 oz Walnut pieces (halves are fine, but need more chopping)
8 oz Full fat cream cheese
2 dessert spoonfulls of mayonnaise (full fat, I mean low fat seems a bit pointless at this point)
1 dollop of single cream

Grate the stilton
Chop the walnuts into small pieces 5mm or so.

Use a fork to mix the stilton and walnuts.

Add cream cheese and mix thoroughly.

Add mayonnaise and mix thoroughly

Dollop on cream and mix. Texture should be semi firm, slightly more viscous than cream cheese.

Ready to serve; ideal on toast, bread, crisps, or with celery or batons of raw pepper or carrot if you want to fool yourself you are being healthy.

This has been a feature at friends and family events for years. No heart attacks yet...
I want to make some now, but I fear I may break your pristine track record if I do.
 

Nobby-W

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Your taste buds will thank you. I think they should have priority over your cardio vascular system :smile:
I'm sure they will. As a suggestion, try having tuna mixed in with a glob of this as a dressing on a baked potato. Tuna and stilton go nicely together. They're a bit overpowering for pasta sauces but work with baked potatoes if you don't overdo it.

However, my extensive collection of stents and bypass grafts says no.
 
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zanshin

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I'm sure they will. As a suggestion, try having tuna mixed in with a glob of this as a dressing on a baked potato. Tuna and stilton go nicely together. They're a bit overpowering for pasta sauces but work with baked potatoes if you don't overdo it.

However, my extensive collection of stents and bypass grafts says no.
I am vegetarian, but thank you for the suggestion.

Hope you maintain sufficient cardio vascular health , and yes, my pate is not advised in those circs.
 

soltakss

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I made a childhood favourite dish a while ago. Baked Potatoes, no not Jacket potatoes, sliced potatoes with sliced onion, sausages and covered in gravy, like a casserole.

When I was at University, many years ago, a café had Baked Potatoes, so I bought a portion, only to find that they meant Jacket Potatoes, I was so disappointed.

Well, my wife has made it 5 or 6 times since, so she must really like it. She doesn't put onions in, which improves the taste. We used Cumberland sausages, instead of Lincolnshire sausages, but she wasn't keen on those.
 

spittingimage

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I need help finding the proper name of a potato-based dish. In my house we always called it baked potatoes, but people outside the house look alarmed when I offer to make it and ask if potatoes are the only part of the dish.

To make this, you take a reasonably sized potato and stab it. then you bake it in the oven until it's cooked through. Cut a flap on one side, scoop out the potatoey centre and mash it with sour cream, bacon bits and herbs. Scoop it back in, cover it with grated cheese and grill for five minutes so the cheese melts.
 

Jetstream

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I need help finding the proper name of a potato-based dish. In my house we always called it baked potatoes, but people outside the house look alarmed when I offer to make it and ask if potatoes are the only part of the dish.

To make this, you take a reasonably sized potato and stab it. then you bake it in the oven until it's cooked through. Cut a flap on one side, scoop out the potatoey centre and mash it with sour cream, bacon bits and herbs. Scoop it back in, cover it with grated cheese and grill for five minutes so the cheese melts.
Twice-Baked Potatoes.

I’d call that a “stuffed potato”, but “loaded baked potato” seems to be what the cool kids say.


A "Loaded baked potato" is a regular baked potato ("jacket potato") with butter, sour cream, cheese, bacon, and chives added to it after it's done cooking.
 

JamesV

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Jacket potato, those aren't clothes, it's the skin. You're eating the potato's skin. Its earthy, delicious, crispy, salted skin.

I mean if you bake a person, you wouldn't start gnawing on a shoe, right?
 

Agemegos

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Next year's supply of cumquat liqueur got together today!

IMG_0582.jpeg

  • 1 litre sipping rum (or brandy)
  • 16 cumquats with wholly intact skins (about 90 g)
  • 96 cubes of white sugar (432 g)
Makes two bottles (fifths).

Over the next eight weeks the sugar cubes will dissolve in the rum, producing a layer of saturated syrup at the bottom of the jar, with a layer of spirit on top of it. It is important that the layers not be disturbed. The cumquats will float above the layer of syrup, surrounded by spirit, and osmosis will draw alcohol into them. Over about eight months the sugar will diffuse through the column of spirit, causing the fruit to float to the top. There, unable to rise any higher, they will in time become surrounded by syrup. Osmosis will draw alcohol and water out of them, extracting essences from the zest. The fruit will shrivel and sink. When they reach the bottom the liqueur will be ready to serve.

For this trick to work you have to use fruit with wholly intact skins. It is best to pick them with scissors or secateurs.
 
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Nobby-W

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Next year's supply of cumquat liqueur got together today!

View attachment 48581

  • 1 litre sipping rum (or brandy)
  • 16 cumquats with wholly intact skins (about 90 g)
  • 96 cubes of white sugar (432 g)
Makes two bottles (fifths).

Over the next eight weeks the sugar cubes will dissolve in the rum, producing a layer of saturated syrup at the bottom of the jar, with a layer of spirit on top of it. It is important that the layers not be disturbed. The cumquats will float above the layer of syrup, surrounded by spirit, and osmosis will draw alcohol into them. Over about eight months the sugar will diffuse through the column of spirit, causing the fruit to float to the top. There, unable to rise any higher, they will in time become surrounded by syrup. Osmosis will draw alcohol and water out of them, extracting essences from the zest. The fruit will shrivel and sink. When they reach the bottom the liqueur will be ready to serve.

For this trick to work you have to use fruit with wholly intact skins. It is best to pick them with scissors or secateurs.

So a non-secateur would be the wrong instrument to pick them with?
 

Agemegos

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I am trying to make a lemon-myrtle Bavarois for tomorrow night’s dessert. So far I have picked leaves from the wrong tree in the darkness once, locked myself out of the house without my keys once, boiled the milk over once, put a white in with the yolks while separating eggs once, curdled the custard once, and cleaned up dog vomit three times. I am strongly tempted to call my guests for tomorrow and tell them I have covid.
 

Fenris-77

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I am trying to make a lemon-myrtle Bavarois for tomorrow night’s dessert. So far I have picked leaves from the wrong tree in the darkness once, locked myself out of the house without my keys once, boiled the milk over once, put a white in with the yolks while separating eggs once, curdled the custard once, and cleaned up dog vomit three times. I am strongly tempted to call my guests for tomorrow and tell them I have covid.
This sounds like a chapter from an Anthony Bourdain book.
 

spittingimage

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I am trying to make a lemon-myrtle Bavarois for tomorrow night’s dessert. So far I have picked leaves from the wrong tree in the darkness once, locked myself out of the house without my keys once, boiled the milk over once, put a white in with the yolks while separating eggs once, curdled the custard once, and cleaned up dog vomit three times. I am strongly tempted to call my guests for tomorrow and tell them I have covid.
Robbed any ancient temples lately? Defiled any altars? Kicked a puppy?
 

soltakss

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I need help finding the proper name of a potato-based dish. In my house we always called it baked potatoes, but people outside the house look alarmed when I offer to make it and ask if potatoes are the only part of the dish.

To me, that is a form of Jacket Potato. They are very nice, too.
 

Ronin

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I need help finding the proper name of a potato-based dish. In my house we always called it baked potatoes, but people outside the house look alarmed when I offer to make it and ask if potatoes are the only part of the dish.

To make this, you take a reasonably sized potato and stab it. then you bake it in the oven until it's cooked through. Cut a flap on one side, scoop out the potatoey centre and mash it with sour cream, bacon bits and herbs. Scoop it back in, cover it with grated cheese and grill for five minutes so the cheese melts.
Thats what my wife would call twice baked potatoes.
 

Agemegos

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I am trying to make a lemon-myrtle Bavarois for tomorrow night’s dessert.

Thursday night’s dinner menu was:

  • Rich cheese biscuits
  • Sweet martinis

  • Waldorf salad (with cranberries instead of grapes)
  • Mount Adam chardonnay

  • Braised beef cheeks
  • Celeriac and parsnip purée
  • Baked carrots
  • Steamed green beans with garlic butter
  • "Sister's Run" Epiphany shiraz 2019

  • Lemon-myrtle Bavarois
  • Lime and ginger syrup
  • Cumquat rum
 
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The Butcher

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Really? I tried it once and decided it tasted like a bunch of cherries took a shit in my mouth.
That was EXACTLY my impression as well but I could never quite articulate it. Thank you.

I have banned soda from my life, but when my wife orders a regular Coke (they’re made with real sugar here in Brazil) I am all too eager to take a sip.
 

3rik

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Not being a big fruit eater I'm not very familiar with cherries, cherry shit or prunes so I have no idea how to describe the taste of Dr. Pepper. Just that I find it oddly enjoyable.
 

Fenris-77

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I fucking love tagine. I first discovered the dish in a Jamie Oliver cookbook and very quickly moved to making it as an occasional lunch and dinner special at the restaurant I was working at at the time. Ah-ha, I found the recipe so I'll post it below. I've since looked at dozens of different recipes to get a feel for the overall ingredient lists and ratios so I can do my own thing.

1663280791743.png
 
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