Vampire: The Masquerade - The Early Years and Personal Horror

I know this is a personal issue for you but Paradox is a much bigger company than White Wolf. They also don't spend any money on their World of Darkness properties. They pretty much have adopted a purely mercenary licensing system for it. Everything is pure profit because they give it to whoever will pay them for it and make nothing themselves.

Also, the decision not to publish Chronicles of Darkness and Old World of Darkness is silly. There was always room for both.
Seems like a good opportunity for a retroclone.
 
I've considered buying shares of Paradox stock, might make it easier to get in contact with some of the right people. It's a longshot even by longshot standards but still
 
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The main issue I think the Assamites needed changing was that whatever people think of them as lore, "these vampires kill other vampires" is pretty unplayable. And if you want uberevil NPCs that's what the Baali are for.
However, if you change it to "these vampires like cannabis more than other vampires", the Assamites not only become playable, but the best available option.
 
Hence why the monetary troubles standout. If they’re investing no money and still failing to make a profit, then…?

I mean, it seems the obvious answer would be all of Paradox's OTHER holdings. Paradox isn't primarily a WOD producer. Paradox is primarily a Crusader Kings and strategy game developer.

They bought the makers of the Shadow Run games and the Overlord games, neither of which have produced games since then. Plus, the IP to Prison Simulator despite that not exactly being a hot property.

They also purchased 33% of Hardsuit Labs right before those dipshits failed to produce Bloodlines 2.
 
Seems like a good opportunity for a retroclone.
While it’s a different setting, the Witch-hunter RPG, orginally by Paradigm Concepts basically used NWoD1e as the basis for their mechanics. It’s a more colonial era game with the players as monster hunters, but the core mechanics are there.
 
I know there’s the whole first mover effect with rpgs (which is why D&D is still top dog despite numerous gaffs that would have destroyed other companies)… but if there was anything that clearly surpassed VtM/WoD lore, one would think it’d at least have some type of following remaining.

The Everlasting fan community that I know online are small, but friendly and passionate
 
I had an idea as a "just for fun" sort of thing.

You know how in the late 90's (late 2e/early Revised Edition), White Wolf would publish these books that were compilations of books from 1e and early 2e?

Vampire got the most, and Werewolf got them too (they even got older Tribebooks reprinted in their compilations) but Mage even got a few of them.

I've always wondered what other books could've been included for these compilations?

From what I can tell, these were the compilations in question...

Chicago Chronicles Volume 1 (Chicago By Night 1e and The Succubus Club)
Chicago Chronicles Volume 2 (CbN 2e and Under A Blood Red Moon)
Chicago Chronicles Volume 3 (Ashes to Ashes, Blood Bond, and Milwaukee by Night)

Diablerie (Awakening: Diablerie Mexico and Bloody Hearts: Diablerie Britain)
War of Ages (Elysium and The Anarch Cookbook)

Cities of Darkness Vol. 1 (New Orleans by Night and DC by Night)
Cities of Darkness Vol. 2 (LA by Night and Berlin by Night)
Cities of Darkness Vol. 3 (Alien Hunger and Dark Colony)


I'm still wondering why was CbN 2e and UBRM Chicago Chronicles Volume 2 and not Volume 3?

Milwaukee By Night works well enough alongside Ashes to Ashes and Blood Bond for Volume 3 but given the heavy presence of Lupines in that one and how it was one of the last 1e books released, you'd think they'd include it with CbN 2e and UBRM instead.

I always wondered what other compilations WW could've done had things played out a little bit differently or if they took a slightly different approach for V20 where certain iconic oWoD stuff got re-released as compilations (complete with an appendix for converting some stuff to be V20 compatible)

In this hypothetical alternate timeline where V20 got a widespread physical release back in 2011, most of the original compilations would be re-released but a few new ones would be made and the Chicago Chronicles would be rearranged for its re-release.

These would be the ideal new compilations...


Chicago Chronicles Volume I (Baptism By Fire, Blood at Dawn, Chicago by Night 1e)
Chicago Chronicles Volume II (Ashes to Ashes, Blood Bond, The Succubus Club)
Chicago Chronicles Volume III (Milwaukee by Night, Under A Blood Red Moon, CbN 2e)

Cities of Darkness Volume 4 (Montreal by Night and Mexico City by Night)
Cities of Darkness Volume 5 (New York by Night and Cairo By Night)
Cities of Darkness Volume 6 (Blood Nativity and Dark Alliance: Vancouver)

Mortal Chronicles Volume I (The Hunters Hunted, Mummy 1e)
Mortal Chronicles Volume II (The Inquisition, Project Twilight, Halls of the Arcanum)
Mortal Chronicles Volume III (The Quick and The Dead, The Autumn People)
Mortal Chronicles Volume IV (Demon Hunter X, World of Darkness: Mafia)

Strange Nights (Dirty Secrets of the Black Hand, Midnight Circus)

Gehenna Chronicles Volume I (Nights of Prophecy, Time of Thin Blood)
Gehenna Chronicles Volume II (The Red Sign, Blood Treachery)
Gehenna Chronicles Volume III (Lair of the Hidden, Gehenna)

The existence of the Storytellers Vault and the increased prominence of PDF and POD makes these ideas pointless nowadays but it's fun to come up with ideas like this.
 
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I mean, it seems the obvious answer would be all of Paradox's OTHER holdings. Paradox isn't primarily a WOD producer. Paradox is primarily a Crusader Kings and strategy game developer.

They bought the makers of the Shadow Run games and the Overlord games, neither of which have produced games since then. Plus, the IP to Prison Simulator despite that not exactly being a hot property.

They also purchased 33% of Hardsuit Labs right before those dipshits failed to produce Bloodlines 2.
Harebrained have a new game out end of the year. 3 years is a reasonable turnaround for a video game studio, especially a no crunch one. (If anything, I think they should just get Harebrained to do the next VtM game. They're a reliable studio for turnbased RPGs).
 
Harebrained have a new game out end of the year. 3 years is a reasonable turnaround for a video game studio, especially a no crunch one. (If anything, I think they should just get Harebrained to do the next VtM game. They're a reliable studio for turnbased RPGs).

I'd like to see a WOD survival horror/puzzle game in the gameplay style of Silent Hill. If someone said the phrase "personal horror" outside the context of WoD/RPGs, Silent Hill 2 is the first thing that would come to mind.
 
I don't know about this reference. I know they had already suggested making a Vampire/other supernatural-oriented game in the back of Ars Magica 2E also in part by MRH, because it suggested Mythic Earth (Ars Magica's setting) as the backdrop for that, I feel it was in the works before the Gen Con drive. Though I cannot be sure of that.

The incestuous nature of RPG design back then ....the portability of the Tremere from Ars Magica to Vampire...

Gary may have just been in the forefront of shitty places to live.
 
The incestuous nature of RPG design back then ....the portability of the Tremere from Ars Magica to Vampire...

Gary may have just been in the forefront of shitty places to live.

Living in Ashland, Ky, which is basically Gary for white people (I kid, I kid), there's a lot of ambience in a decaying steel town in the 90s. Things that could be somewhat easily adapted from Dracula to modern nights.

* You had the big decaying ruined buildings (factories instead of castles)
* A decent number of mansions built for the rich just a few decades prior that are now either uninhabited or for sale
* A lot of shuddered businesses and senses of lost prosperity
* A loss of population that left a lot of places feeling somewhat abandoned and ill-maintained
* You had the population that was impoverished and listless
* You had cold, impersonal forces that had ruined people's lives in corporations versus ancient nobility
* A perception of danger and rising crime versus the superstitious wolves and vampires in the Wildernes

It was basically a setting update that took the idea of "this place is not safe and its glory days are past it" and then moved it from Transylvania to the Great Lakes.

Robocop had done the same of essentially turning Detroit from one of America's most prosperous cities in public mind to, "crime ridden cyberpunk dystopia basis for all subsequent video games and stories."
 
This thread inspired me to do WHAT DO VAMPIRE PCS KNOW as an article.

I hope people will check it out.

Really good article, thanks!

Honestly, this is what I think puts me off ever running VtM again.

Ignorance is valuable. Note, I don't say ignorance is bliss. I say ignorance is valuable. One of the best advantages you can have as a Storyteller is your players (or their characters) being ignorant of something in-universe. This is usually not possible if they're, like I was, someone who buys every Clan Book or supplement to look for cool concepts. Many players, whether they have disposable income or just borrow a friend's books, are working on their graduate student thesis level knowledge of the World of Darkness' secrets

The clash between "game about secret lore and hidden conspiracies" and "players with a high knowledge of the hidden parts of the university" is too difficult to reconcile.

Yes, good roleplayers can pretend to be ignorant, but it's still a big leap from actually not knowing what's going on.

So something like investigating Golconda rumours isn't going to work in the same way; the players already know there's something definite to find even if their PCs don't.

This is all aggraravated by the fact that IME Vampire players frequently dislike any major changes from canon.
 
Really good article, thanks!

Honestly, this is what I think puts me off ever running VtM again.

The clash between "game about secret lore and hidden conspiracies" and "players with a high knowledge of the hidden parts of the university" is too difficult to reconcile.

Yes, good roleplayers can pretend to be ignorant, but it's still a big leap from actually not knowing what's going on.

So something like investigating Golconda rumours isn't going to work in the same way; the players already know there's something definite to find even if their PCs don't.

This is all aggraravated by the fact that IME Vampire players frequently dislike any major changes from canon.

Thanx!

I would dispute this and basically point to V:TM: Bloodlines as the best example of how you can have your cake and eat it too. That game is absolutely dripping with huge amounts of lore ranging from the common (Camarilla, Anarchs, Sabbat) to the incredibly obscure (wereshark! Nagaraja!). However, it presents the lore in little driplets and does so in a way that tanatalizes long term fans while leaving your character pretty ignorant.

Which says, "If you can keep it grounded, players won't mind hearing the Tremere Council of Seven explained to them in hushed whispers."
 
I almost quit a long running national vampire larp when some characters unveiled a dossier they'd been compiling on lupines and it held in depth detail of EVERY tribe including the Bunyip!

Even today I maintain the dossier should have been three lines.

'Lupines are real.'
'They can and will kill us.'
'That's all we know.'
 
I almost quit a long running national vampire larp when some characters unveiled a dossier they'd been compiling on lupines and it held in depth detail of EVERY tribe including the Bunyip!

Even today I maintain the dossier should have been three lines.

'Lupines are real.'
'They can and will kill us.'
'That's all we know.'

I believe that there could be a 4th line with 4 occult: "Silver seems to hurt them. Keep stock of it."
 
Would anyone be down for a Vampire 1e game using the old setting (no metaplot, no V5 or Revised stuff) but with some new hidden tweaks, mysteries, and hidden alternate directions for the setting?

I've always thought it'd be interesting to do an unofficial fan reboot/"What if?" using only the V1 corebook (and maybe a few other 1e books) and then developing an alternate take on the whole setting from there.

I know there's a Storytellers Vault book that does that sort of premise for the Lupines and it's honestly pretty cool.
 
Would anyone be down for a Vampire 1e game using the old setting (no metaplot, no V5 or Revised stuff) but with some new hidden tweaks, mysteries, and hidden alternate directions for the setting?

I've always thought it'd be interesting to do an unofficial fan reboot/"What if?" using only the V1 corebook (and maybe a few other 1e books) and then developing an alternate take on the whole setting from there.

I know there's a Storytellers Vault book that does that sort of premise for the Lupines and it's honestly pretty cool.

I'd be interested in a 1st Edition game possibly.
 
The clash between "game about secret lore and hidden conspiracies" and "players with a high knowledge of the hidden parts of the university" is too difficult to reconcile.

Yes, good roleplayers can pretend to be ignorant, but it's still a big leap from actually not knowing what's going on.

So something like investigating Golconda rumours isn't going to work in the same way; the players already know there's something definite to find even if their PCs don't.

This is all aggraravated by the fact that IME Vampire players frequently dislike any major changes from canon.

That's why I've habitually used "exotic" locations or "exotic" splats to kill that metagaming habit dead. How many people specialize in Laibon (besides me)? How many care about Nepalese Kuei-Jin or whispers of remnant Anda in Kyrgyzstan (besides me)? Time and Space and Breadth of Knowledge are the greatest weapons to blast pedantic know-it-alls on a variety of subjects because you cannot know it all, the world is simply too big. :thumbsup:

Wanna play Breath of the Rising Phoenix in a declining population Japanese rural town of elders? The focal point will be about retaining fading local knowledge without succumbing to the local Bone Flower suggestions to switch Dharmas. Bleeding edge obscurity? Perhaps. But it's basically a reskin of the classic struggle of ideological friction in the face of entropy; see: Camarilla vs Anarch or Sabbat in a changing world.

But then I prefer moral explorations of trenchcoats... :cry: and katanas, just like how I enjoy alignment. :hmmm:

Would anyone be down for a Vampire 1e game using the old setting (no metaplot, no V5 or Revised stuff) but with some new hidden tweaks, mysteries, and hidden alternate directions for the setting?

I've always thought it'd be interesting to do an unofficial fan reboot/"What if?" using only the V1 corebook (and maybe a few other 1e books) and then developing an alternate take on the whole setting from there.

I know there's a Storytellers Vault book that does that sort of premise for the Lupines and it's honestly pretty cool.

I'd be interested in a 1st Edition game possibly.

:clown: I already suggested Moosejaw by Night. Populate that and Regina & Winnipeg, Saskatchewan. Throw in lupines who'd prefer vamps would stay in their lanes and not commute between these cities that often. Boom, points of light isolation: creates need for functional caravans for safety, diplomacy with the wilderness powers, and entrenching support NPCs to survive the harsh winters. Along with 1e's degrading Ghouling rules (you have to consistently feed blood to maintain the obedience), and other overlooked changes from 1e to 2e+ & on, it really tamps down on excesses.
 
:clown: I already suggested Moosejaw by Night. Populate that and Regina & Winnipeg, Saskatchewan.
Winnipeg is in Manitoba. (Did you mean Weyburn?) As to the other two, by the usual ratio, there might be about 2 vampires in Regina and not even 1 in Moose Jaw.
 
I already suggested Moosejaw by Night. Populate that and Regina & Winnipeg, Saskatchewan. Throw in lupines who'd prefer vamps would stay in their lanes and not commute between these cities that often. Boom, points of light isolation: creates need for functional caravans for safety, diplomacy with the wilderness powers, and entrenching support NPCs to survive the harsh winters. Along with 1e's degrading Ghouling rules (you have to consistently feed blood to maintain the obedience), and other overlooked changes from 1e to 2e+ & on, it really tamps down on excesses.

If you're gonna go for a setting untouched by any WW supplements, why not go for an actual Gothic-Punk hellmouth and set it in Roanoke, Virginia?
 
That was the lamest aspect of WW games back in the day

About the Splats Not Playing Well With Others... I think I've changed my mind over the years about my displeasure about that. It's reminiscent to me like the Punching & Wrestling Table from AD&D 2e. I hated it on first sight, but after trying other systems, getting older, and then returning to use it, I've surprised myself in liking it. Like a lot of my return to games of my youth, I think I've come to appreciate things I disliked before for reasons I didn't expect to find. :grin:

I found the isolating incompatibility helped focus on the moral quandary themes with each Monster Line. For example, Vampire themes and Changeling themes do not overlap much, let alone canonically or mechanically (beyond Kiasyd & Mytherceria). So it pushes GMs to question what warrants so deep a dive in translating one N/PC from the other with high mechanic fidelity. It's like the wisdom of the Sage calling on us to simplify, "What are you getting out of high fidelity compatibility? How does that further the motivating tensions beyond Battle Royale comparisons?"

It's why I think the Virtues, Willpower, & Splat-specific SAN Meters are the forgotten core of Storyteller. They call you back to the moral quandary themes, and why they are different from monster to monster. Otherwise I think any Generalist or Supers RPG would probably serve better for free-for-alls.

So I found myself clarifying cross-splat monsters to what purpose they serve. That helped me to reduce the cruft of NPC stat-blocks. This saved me time in creativity & bookkeeping considerably. Granted yes, it gets annoying, e.g. Vampires with Necromancy and then having to dissolve Wraiths into Index Card stat-blocks. But it taught me to unclench on the details and focus on the higher priority elements; like in art learning the value of composition, thumbnailing, value blocking, etc. before fussing on detail work.

I don't know how to really put a price on that sort of counter-intuitive game line focus & GM best practice advice. :quiet: I think it upped my GM game without being aware of it.

I'd like to see a WOD survival horror/puzzle game in the gameplay style of Silent Hill. If someone said the phrase "personal horror" outside the context of WoD/RPGs, Silent Hill 2 is the first thing that would come to mind.

That would be quite cool. I could see that as Wraith, or even better, Mummy. Something about staring headlong at eternity tamping down the tension of dying frequently, letting the puzzle aspect rise to equivalence. Mummies going through reincarnated memories, while surviving reality, seems like a good split in the same action & puzzle blend like Legacy of Kain & Silent Hill games.
 
Winnipeg is in Manitoba. (Did you mean Weyburn?) As to the other two, by the usual ratio, there might be about 2 vampires in Regina and not even 1 in Moose Jaw.

Probably? :clown: No, no I'm just lumping everything between Vancouver & Toronto together because I'm not *that* good with Canadian geography. :hehe:

As for ratios... that's always adjustable. :thumbsup: Perhaps 1 vamp per 10k people, instead of 1:100k, or a ratio between. Or perhaps borrow from Ashirra sect Faith rituals where you can have a vampire stretch their feeding requirements out. Or maybe Laibon Aye/Orun Path that can feed on animals better, and count the livestock to adjust the population that can be sustained.
 
If you're gonna go for a setting untouched by any WW supplements, why not go for an actual Gothic-Punk hellmouth and set it in Roanoke, Virginia?

Well, we have your previous topic for you to populate your World of Darkness. :wink: Scribble up a few N/PCs. Me? I'm still dancing like Ian Curtis on the dancefloor there.

But I also like the idea of rural Canadian vampires. I am imagining vampire tricks with Tupperware, snow gear, and passive-aggressive politeness out of a Letterkenney skit. However we are also quite blessed with several members here who could fill in the blanks just as well as you can with Roanoke, VA. :music: Put in a funny Inconnu sire with their bored childer and you have roleplaying solid gold!
 
About the Splats Not Playing Well With Others... I think I've changed my mind over the years about my displeasure about that. It's reminiscent to me like the Punching & Wrestling Table from AD&D 2e. I hated it on first sight, but after trying other systems, getting older, and then returning to use it, I've surprised myself in liking it. Like a lot of my return to games of my youth, I think I've come to appreciate things I disliked before for reasons I didn't expect to find. :grin:

i liked the Punching & Wrestling Table from 2e too

I found the isolating incompatibility helped focus on the moral quandary themes with each Monster Line. For example, Vampire themes and Changeling themes do not overlap much, let alone canonically or mechanically (beyond Kiasyd & Mytherceria). So it pushes GMs to question what warrants so deep a dive in translating one N/PC from the other with high mechanic fidelity. It's like the wisdom of the Sage calling on us to simplify, "What are you getting out of high fidelity compatibility? How does that further the motivating tensions beyond Battle Royale comparisons?"

The issue is that I think they intentionally implied the games were compatible, whether subtly, through the very concept of the "World of Darkness" label, or more overtly, with cross-line sourcebooks and actual discussions of using other lines in the rulebooks. So i'd often, as a GM, have a group want to play a mixed supernatural party. And sure I could say "no, I just want to run one game to focus on it's themes" (and I've done that), but sometimes I also wanted the implied promise of the WoD.

It's why I think the Virtues, Willpower, & Splat-specific SAN Meters are the forgotten core of Storyteller. They call you back to the moral quandary themes, and why they are different from monster to monster. Otherwise I think any Generalist or Supers RPG would probably serve better for free-for-alls.

Personally, I think the reason they are forgotten is that they weren't very good, as mechanics. They seem "tacked on" and disconnected from a game feedback loop - closer to WFRP's fate points than well-integrated behavioural mechanics like FASERIP's Karma or Pendragon's Passions. Maybe they work for you, I just found them lacklustre at evoking the flavour intended.

I was hoping CoD would fix these issues, an opportunity to overhaul the house system, and it seemed like they were going in that direction with the shared core rulebook, but....it was ultimately disappointing.
 
One element I hated about the subsequent elements of Vampire: The Masquerade was the increasing "orientalism" of the setting and it started pretty orientalist. I get the original game was made by a bunch of white dude Southeners for whom Chicago was actually a pretty far off location but the write-ups of the rest of the world were so damned weird.

* Mexico is apparently Mordor, ruled by Black Spiral Dancers and Nephandi and Sabbat.
* Africa is this mysterious unfathomable ancient realm as if you can't just take a plane there or trade hasn't existed for thousands of years.
* The Middle East is run by a bunch of blood drinking assassin cultists until we find out in the Dark Ages, it was the most civilized of all vampire realms (but Muslim! Even though Islam is only a few centuries old by that point)
* All of Asia has alien ghost vampires instead of regular vampires out of a misguided attempt to incorporate local legends, instead somehow even being more racist.
* Russia is run by Baba Yaga and her armies of darkness--which ALMOST got redeemed by Rage Across Russia where it was noted, "Yeah, that's pretty damn weird." But BY being a werewolf villain is certainly more sensible than her being a V:TM one.
 
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lol, their treatment even of the UK was hilaribad. WoD is possibly the most Amerocentric gameline ever made.

I remember in 1999, I was addicted to the White Wolf forums and the Changeling: The Dreaming line was weirdly my jam.

ISLE OF THE MIGHTY was the most hated supplement ever as a huge chunk were UK fans and it was this twee Mary Poppins-esque take on London.

And they're like, "You realize a huge chunk of your fans are punks, right?"
 
ISLE OF THE MIGHTY was the most hated supplement ever as a huge chunk were UK fans and it was this twee Mary Poppins-esque take on London.
The British isles, arguably THE motherlode of Celtic myth and legend and we got....that. I've kept my copy to remind myself that no matter how bad my writing is, it's not that bad.

(That's a lie. I sold all my changeling stuff but no one wanted that.)
 
TristramEvans, I absolutely agree that the implied sale was an integrated monstrous world with compatible lines. And yes, that ticked me off then, and it still leaves me a little disappointed now. A bait and switch is never a good thing, and White Wolf's Storyteller system was very much that (I personally think it was more naive ineptitude married with rule-of-cool and math-phobia, but that's another discussion).

That and the SAN systems were not well integrated into the feedback loop of play. That again goes to my above assumptions of Storyteller's system design not going through real rigor but more "theater kids" wish-casting. That said... though I like CoC's SAN, if I am honest I like it mostly for its simplicity and reliance on GM judgment. So as much as I dislike the "it's just there, on the character sheet, and the GM's yet to touch it..." aspect of Storyteller's SAN systems, I appreciate they are not what has been currently en vogue for the past few decades with fidgety, high granularity, economies, etc. It's a love-hate thing; if you gotta have one, best one that's limp until the GM or Player evokes it through play, instead of one all up in my face.

Yeah, I share your same frustrations. But I've yet to be impressed by anything modern as better. Now Pendragon, et al., yes. But sometimes discrete (separate) is better than integrated, in my experience (like so many cascading effects leading to unintended consequences. <.< PF 1e). So I am left torn.

------------

CT_Phipps, as for WW's Orientalism... I'd say they also suffered from Occidentalism, too (and Australism & Borealism as well, like you noted in their South America, Africa, E. Europe & Russian works). First off a lot of the European books were like... "Have you ever been to Europe?" That and its right in the Goth-Punk aesthetic disclaimer, Goth. Note how Japanese Francophiles are having breakdowns upon Paris and such not living up to their dreams; there's way more than one exoticized "-ism" than Orientalism as defined by Edward Said. (Though that said, I might actually be the first person to give voice and definition to such Occidentalism, Australism, & Borealism, so I would appreciate in future academic citations to add my Pretzel FishMalk avatar to my handle. :hehe:)

I mean, you said it in your post -- and I said it in a previous post on this very topic -- it's a bunch of USA Southerners looking at the whole wide world in an exoticized lens. Gary, Indiana is mythologized for goodness' sake!, because it's the "Urban North, Near Chicago." I would postulate that a better word to encapsulate this worldview is the already well-established word "Provincial."

Now Provincial is not a geographically tied term, as anywhere on earth people can be labeled with Provincial thinking. But it captures a spatial sophistication between Isolated Provinces and Cosmopolitan Urbanity (and not all urban places are a sophisticated cosmopolis). Now it is normally negative label, but I think of it here as a descriptor, and I hold it with an almost loving romance with its dreams and nightmares of places unknown. Yes, I am definitely holding an aesthetic Gothic meaning here (the rejected of the past embraced and seen anew).

-------------

And hence why I think that could be a delightful inversion of type for play in Moose Jaw (or Roanoke) by Night. It allows my Cosmopolitan Urbanity to be "Provincial" in its ignorance of these Terra Incognita less populated areas ("Fly-Over Country", as by Coastal Urban Elites :hehe:). I have visited such places, have family in such places, and have far greater knowledge than many other Cosmopolitan Urbanists in this -- but I don't truly know them. WoD's Provincial fever dreaming gives me inspired license to put my ignorance, frustrations, and romance of such less populated areas into a lens and craft a beautiful Dream-Nightmare delusion of said places. It allows one to paint with abandon one's Id, I get to be the yokel, and I find that *so* compelling! :kiss:

:grin: Don't you others get so inspired? Can you re-imagine the forgotten and overlooked, whip up your imagination without such realism restraints? I heard SE Kentucky, NE Tennessee had the most mayonnaise-slathered food imaginable. Do you think there's a "The Stuff" monster hiding out in the nearby Hellman's Mayonnaise factory? Is this the cause of DocSammy's disenchantment with Roanoke, VA? Do the local Werewolves need to stop fighting each other and deal with this menace? Or perhaps it's my ignorance & paranoia, because who's to say how much mayonnaise is too much mayonnaise? :dice:
 
CT_Phipps CT_Phipps

Have you ever been to Roanoke, Virginia?

(Not to be confused with Roanoke Island, North Carolina AKA "The Lost Colony of Roanoke", of course)

Would you be down for a V1 game set there? Now, the setting wouldn't just be the City of Roanoke proper but also all of Roanoke County plus the City of Salem, the Town of Vinton, and the adjacent Botetourt and Franklin Counties, all of which make up the Roanoke Valley Metropolitan Area.

The Roanoke Valley isn't anywhere near as awesome as Chicago By Night but it is the one and only Star City of the South and a bona fide Gothic-Punk semi-urban/suburban hellscape IRL
 
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I've already fleshed out my NPC outlines of Moose Jaw by Night (ratio vamp : human is 1 : 10k, so 3 vamps in residence). I just need to flesh out locations and maybe things/hooks. I'll put it up in the design forum sometime soon. :thumbsup: Come check it out!

And maybe later come help me fill in my Regina! ::honkhonk:
 
The British isles, arguably THE motherlode of Celtic myth and legend and we got....that. I've kept my copy to remind myself that no matter how bad my writing is, it's not that bad.

(That's a lie. I sold all my changeling stuff but no one wanted that.)
Which book was it that had the Poll Tax riot started by an alliance of football hooligans and hippies? It was the same one that had Manchester and Liverpool as the same fief, seemingly not realising that the rivalry there goes back years.
 
CT_Phipps CT_Phipps

Have you ever been to Roanoke, Virginia?

(Not to be confused with Roanoke Island, North Carolina AKA "The Lost Colony of Roanoke", of course)

Would you be down for a V1 game set there? Now, the setting wouldn't just be the City of Roanoke proper but also all of Roanoke County plus the City of Salem, the Town of Vinton, and the adjacent Botetourt and Franklin Counties, all of which make up the Roanoke Valley Metropolitan Area.

The Roanoke Valley isn't anywhere near as awesome as Chicago By Night but it is the one and only Star City of the South and a bona fide Gothic-Punk semi-urban/suburban hellscape IRL

That does sound awesome but my schedule may or may not allow it depending on what kind of game it is. Which is a shame but wanted to be upfront.
 
Apologies for the thread necromancy but I've been thinking on something.

We should make Roanoke By Night a thing, and maybe it could be a collaborative project?
 
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