What were your RPG Firsts?

Spellslinging Sellsword

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Just curious what RPG people here played first and also what was the first RPG product you owned?

For me, I bought the Mentzer Basic and Expert Sets along with the Forgotten Realms gray campaign boxed set at Toys-R-Us. I read them and taught myself how role-playing worked from those three boxed sets. I then started running games for my friends.
 

EmperorNorton

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2e AD&D. My brother and I got them from Waldenbooks in the local mall, and taught ourselves and ran games for our friends. I was like 6ish and he was around 9 at the time.
 

Gabriel

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First RPG I owned: B/X D&D Basic Set.

First formal RPG I played: "D&D". My fighter was squashed into a splatter of gore by the "100 foot tall adamantite golem familiar" of the other player's Magic User character.
 

3rik

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first played: GURPS 3E
first owned: GURPS 3E Revised

 

T. Foster

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D&D Basic Set (1983, red box with Larry Elmore cover art) followed pretty quickly by the D&D Expert Rulebook (1981, pale blue book with Erol Otus cover art). My best friend and D&D buddy had the opposite (1981 Basic Rulebook and 1983 Expert Set box). Neither of us realized until years later that there was any difference between these books besides the art. We spent about 6 months working our characters up to about 10th level before "graduating up" to AD&D.
 

Endless Flight

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I think the Marvel Super Heroes basic set was the first game I bought.
 

dokel

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Traveller. Original 1977 edition boxed lbbs.
 

The Mad Hatter

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First played and owned is the swedish Drakar och Demoner in 1988.
It's rules are very BRP like.
It was translated into danish, and I discovered it in the library before buying it.
 

ffilz

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First played: Holmes Basic D&D
First Owned: I'm actually not sure. Candidates would be OD&D (6th printing), RuneQuest, Bunnies & Burrows, Gamma World, Traveller based on what was published through 1978 (I got AD&D Players Handbook for Christmas 1978 but I KNOW that was not my first RPG product). It may well be the OD&D boxed set. But another possibility is actually a Judges Guild product.

The item in my gaming collection that I KNOW I laid hands on first is my copy of Chivalry and Sorcery. I bought it from a friend, but he got it for Christmas in 1977 after his mom showed it to me and asked me what I thought of it. I'm almost certain I had not bought any RPG items between when I first played Holmes at his birthday party in October of 1977 and Christmas.

I think actually I got some fantasy miniatures for Christmas of 1977 so they may be the first RPG related things I owned.

Now the first RPG item I laid hands on was OD&D. I was in a hobby shop with money to burn. I was getting into miniatures gaming (having been board gaming before then). I looked at Tractics and OD&D. OD&D didn't look like a miniatures wargame (despite claiming so...) so I bought Tractics. But I DID leaf through the books.

The first war game I owned was Avalon Hill's Tactics II purchased at a yard sale in 1972 give or take a year. I honestly don't remember if I got it before or after we went to Europe in 1972, I know it was before I was in 5th grade. The folks running the yard sale weren't sure if it was appropriate for a kid my age (other things I know triggered this: Alistair MacClean's When Eight Bells Toll also purchased around this time, and a US War Department Engineer Field Manual on Camouflage purchased some years later).
 

K_Peterson

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First played: it was either OD&D or Holmes Basic D&D - (I don''t remember seeing a rulebook). I was invited by my brother to go to one of his friend's house. I was told to roll 3D6 a number of times; told that I was going to be the cleric when I rolled an 18 Wisdom; bought weapons/armor/equipment and then we started right into the adventure.

That was the summer of 1981, and later that year I saw Moldvay Basic D&D in a Montgomery Ward catalog. I begged my mother to buy it for me, and unwrapped Moldvay Basic and the Star Frontiers boxed set that Christmas.
 

Nicomos

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My oldest brother was in to Avalon Hill & SPI war games, which I’d play w/him. One day he bought Gamma World 1e, it was in the game section at the local hobby store. He wasn’t sure what to make of it. It wasn’t what he expected. I read through it and ran a couple of my younger brothers through an adventure. After that I put it away and never looked at it again.

A year later, I think it was, I bought a copy of basic D&D, after hearing about it from another guy in school.....
 

FaerieGodfather

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My stepfather taught me to play when I was twelve years old with the AD&D 1e core rules and... let's say a whimsical understanding of the rules.

The first RPG book I owned by myself was Thri-Kreen of Athas.
 

Simlasa

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First played AD&D, with some friends. Also the first people I ever ran a game for (exploding golden skeletons!).

First owned AD&D and Traveller (bought on same outing).
 

Trippy

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First RPG that I personally bought was Stormbringer. The Games Workshop/Chaosium 3rd edition. It had the most awesome art on the cover. I bought it at Games Workshop in Birmingham, UK.

It fell apart within a few months, though.
 

Tommy Brownell

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First product I owned was the X-Men Campaign set for Marvel FASERIP (Advanced). Had no idea what RPGs were or expansions/supplements were...just knew I liked the X-Men.

Turns out, I guess it was kind of a gateway.

For game I played was AD&D 2e, which I ran, after I bought the X-Men campaign set but before I ever ran it.

Though I was also playing/running games like HeroQuest before either of them.
 

Dumarest

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First RPG I ever played (1980? 1981?): my older brother and his friends played Advanced Dungeons & Dragons and somehow I ended up involved as well. Later Star Frontiers and Gangbusters as well. I eventually inherited my brother's RPGs. I think The Fantasy Trip and Twilight: 2000 were among them. Maybe some others. I still have the original AD&D Players Handbook, Dungeon Masters Guide, and Monster Manual that I got from him maybe in 1984--I'm guessing based on the release date of Twilight: 2000, as he was into military stuff and I think he thought it would be more like the movie Red Dawn and was disappointed in what it turned out to be. He also would have turned 13 early that year and found other things to do instead of play RPGs. Either way, my gain.

The first RPG that belonged solely to me (i.e., not my brother's or co-owned with someone) was Traveller, which my older sister's boyfriend-at-the-time gave to me since he wasn't that into it. He was kind of stupid. Here is my actual boxed set complete with the GDW survey card:
20171014_083335.jpg
From there, it seems like virtually every early- to mid-'80s RPG from TSR and FGU found its way to me. The most intriguing of those FGU games, at least to me, remains Flashing Blades. There was a comic book shop near me that also had an extensive display of RPGs, some of which sat unsold for years, so I was able to get my hands on lots of unusual games like Golden Heroes and Heroes of Olympus. I even have Pirates and Plunder, Man, Myth & Magic, and Powers & Perils on a seldom-visited shelf. I have original copies of almost every RPG that ever interested me.

One of these days I'm going to start a thread of games I'm giving away to anyone who wants to pay the postage.
 

Justin Alexander

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First RPG I bought was the Batman RPG from Mayfair. Read it. Didn't understand what to do with it.

My dad gave me his copies of Middle-Earth Roleplaying and Bunnies & Burrows. Read them. Got as far as creating a character in MERP, but still didn't understand what I was supposed to do with them.

First RPG I played was a homebrew Batman RPG: My brother played Batman. I was the GM. The mechanics were simple. Any time Batman tried to do anything, we both rolled a d6. If he rolled higher, Batman succeeded. If I rolled higher, Batman failed. And we rolled for EVERY action declaration. Which is how the game ended with Batman crashing the Batmobile while driving to Gotham City.

Bought the BECMI Basic Set. With the solo adventure in that book and the included module for actual play, it finally clicked.
 

Doc Sammy

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Dungeons & Dragons 3.5 for both of those
 

Halda

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The first RPG I got was the MERP boxed set. The first I played was red box D&D... very badly. The first real game I can remember was a game of AD&D using Oriental Adventures at school during lunch.
 

CRKrueger

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First bought and played - Moldvay Basic and Expert Sets. 1981/1982 School Year (8th Grade)
 

Trippy

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First game I actually played was D&D Basic set. Somebody brought it into school, and we started up a club of sorts. However, hardly anybody else had the official rules, so we tended to buy White Dwarf magazine and just interpret them ourselves.

It was only years later, in some cases, that I actually read the official rules and said ‘so that’s what you were meant to do....’.
 

Joey2k

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First rpg was Star Wars 1E from WEG. I was interested in the concept thanks to game books like Lone Wolf and Fighting Fantasy. D&D was the only rpg I had heard of, but it was "satanic", so I wasn't allowed to get that. I was thrilled when I saw the Star Wars books in the store. No way my parents would object to that.

D6 remains my favorite system to this day.
 

Toadmaster

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First game played some variant of D&D that involved the AD&D Monster Manual and Players Handbook, DMG wasn't out yet.

First game product purchased was the AD&D Monster Manual and Players Handbook. Second was the Dungeon Master Guide but I had to wait for it to be released. I still have that Monster Manual, all of my other AD&D books managed to go walk about over the years including my 1st ed Dieties & Demigods with Cthulhu :shock: .

I have actually never owned any official version of Basic D&D although I have played it a handful of times. Being 10-11 when discovering RPGs we didn't have time for any baby steps games (from our perspective :tongue: ). The games using Basic that I have played were years later when I was in my early 20s.

I'm pretty sure Runequest (2E) was the second game I played, although it might have been Traveller. It is very hard to remember the fine details from 40 years ago, plus we crammed in so many games into the period 1980-86.
 

Dumarest

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The mention of "Satanic" D&D reminds me that I should have mentioned I had the benefit of open-minded classical liberal parents who thought if these roleplaying games got kids to voluntarily read books, look up sesquipedalian words, learn mythology, and use their imaginations, they were all for it. Nudity in the Monster Manual wasn't an issue. My dad at one time wanted to be a painter and just shrugged at it and thought it was too bad the illustrations were so shitty. He also fought Nazis in WW2 so you'd have a hard time shocking him with violence as well. My mom couldn't care less about nudity either as she was the type who took us to art museums and the Museum of Man and the Natural History Museum and such places where you'd often see nudes of various types. Big deal. She probably also thought the drawings were not very good. They'd rather buy a Monster Manual and some comic books for us than junk food or toy guns. :thumbsup:
 

Moonglum

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First roleplaying-adjacent game I owned or played: 3rd ed. Chainmail (ca. 1976)

First roleplaying game item I owned: G1 (Steading of the Hill Giant Chief). (1978). I knew nothing about D+D but saw this in a display at FAO Schwartz during a family vacation to Chicago and convinced my parents to buy it for me. I didn't understand what it was, but grocked that it must be related in some way to Chainmail and the fantasy battles I played with my collection of lead figures.

First roleplaying game I owned and played as intended: Melee (1978)

First serious investment in the hobby: 1E AD&D Player's Handbook (1978)
 

Gabriel

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The first time I enjoyed playing an RPG.

I've told the stories of several of my early games. Those stories were all nightmare stories. Yet, despite those experiences, I kept on trying to enjoy RPGs. Why? Well, I enjoyed reading the ones I had. I also had my pre-RPG experience with my best friend where I knew for a fact that playing pretend was fun.

It was a summer day in 1983. Two other friends and I had just returned from watching Metalstorm: The Destruction of Jared Synn at the theater. We didn't have any money, so we couldn't go down to 7-11 and play the Joust machine. We didn't want to stay home and play Kaboom or Combat on the Atari either. Plus, it was damn hot outside (Texas summer), so we didn't want to just ride our bikes around. We needed something to do. I suggested we could play D&D.

These friends had never been exposed to D&D before. They had heard of it, but their only exposure had been the Intellivision video game and the castle shaped electronic board game. They were willing to give the RPG a shot, though. As the only person who knew the game, I'd have to be DM. It was my first time attempting to DM.

I had to run back to my house to get my stuff. I came back with my Basic box set and module B3: Palace of the Silver Princess. I walked them through making characters. I don't recall what they made. I believe it was two fighters or perhaps a fighter and a dwarf. I didn't give them any NPCs because I didn't know that I should. I don't really recall how they survived what followed in the module. I must have cheated incessantly to keep them alive.

I recall starting with the programmed intro in the gatehouse. I had thought this intro was a bit lame, but they took to it immediately. They had a little skirmish with the skeletons, but eventually figured out the programmed puzzle and were off exploring the Palace.

It's getting close to 4 decades since that game. I don't remember details. I have some dim recollection of them talking to goblins and freaking out about the illusory warrior with the magic sword. I remember them finding two of the silver dragon statuettes, and when they found the second one that was when I decided to wildly improvise.

The game had been going on for a few hours by now and things were starting to drag. They were getting bored and I was wanting to wrap stuff up. So when they got the second silver dragon statuette, I had both the tiny statues come to life. I described them as little dragons jumping and running around. They were greatly entertained and reinvigorated by this, so I just kept on describing the antics of the miniature dragons and pointing out they seemed to want the characters to follow them.

I basically had the miniature dragons take them on a scenic route to the finale of the adventure. I hit a few rooms I felt were highlights of the adventure along the way, such as the room with the ruby sword. So yeah, I railroaded them, but they followed along and it enhanced the adventure for them. And it was my first time ever running a game. So a little railroading was probably the least of my poor choices in style.

They freed the princess and saved everything. I gave them XP and the princess rewarded them. I think the princess had some new dragon statuettes made for them (if memory serves the original dragon statuettes merge to reform Eric's dragon at the end of the dungeon). My two friends commented on how cool the game was.

And I never played again with those friends. See, we started exploring in real life. We found an "abandoned" house which we made a clubhouse in. Well, the owners didn't like that, and the short version of the story is we got arrested. My parents felt my friends were the delinquents. Their parents felt I was the delinquent. So we were forbidden from associating ever again. And that's how my friendship with them ended.

But on that day I learned that I could DM if I had a willing audience, but what I really wanted to do was play and enjoy things as they had been enjoying what I ran. But that kind of experience was still well over a year away from me.
 

Trippy

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The 'satanic panic’ of the 1980s was so cretinous in all respects - it was the equivalent of 1930s prohibition in as much as was so counterproductive - it did more to promote the game commercially than anything other than that cartoon, quite possibly. Nobody whoever pushed that agenda ever apologises for it either.
 

EmperorNorton

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The 'satanic panic’ of the 1980s was so cretinous in all respects - it was the equivalent of 1930s prohibition in as much as was so counterproductive - it did more to promote the game commercially than anything other than that cartoon, quite possibly. Nobody whoever pushed that agenda ever apologises for it either.
I had to convince my mom that there was nothing wrong with D&D before she would get us the books way back then. She's smart but you know, she only knew what she heard. Once she saw the actual books and learned it was just a game of make believe she bought us the books to play.

On the other hand, a girlfriend I had when I was in high school, her dad was a fundie christian. I tried to convince him that you know, RPGs are just playing make believe and it pretty much is what you make of it. He never listened. She just played in our games without anyone telling him that was what we were doing.

I guess in the end I won that argument though cause later I got married to that girlfriend and we both still play RPGs all the time (and are also still married :tongue:). Hell, she plays in more games than I do.
 

Trippy

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I was educated in both the UK and, briefly, in a NZ Catholic school. The UK school was a high academic-based Grammar school, and basically saw RPG hobby (as with a bunch of other school clubs on offer) as a good way of promoting social and life skills, as well as literacy and numeracy. The Catholic school saw the RPG hobby as satanic and had a bunch of tits come to our school during assembly to inform us of how they would protect us from it. That’s the abiding memory of D&D in the 1980s for me.
 

TristramEvans

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Posted this tale before, but...

In my 8th year my family made the move from the small suburban town of Kingston, Ontario to the small rural town of Kensington, Pennsylvania. It was here that I made three close friends (not including the girl next door , Carrie-Ann, who always came by wanting to "hang out"); Chris, David, and Seth. And it was these friends that introduced me to RPGs.

I'd known "game books", sort of proto or pseudo-RPGs like Lone Wolf that I consumed along with a steady diet of Choose Your Own Adventure books. And I'd been aware of Dungeons & Dragons before that point, though primarily as a Saturday Morning cartoon and toy line. I'd had a friend in Ontario who owned the Red Box, but even though I expressed an interest in playing, he'd always say that he needed his father to "make the maps" or something or other I didn't quite understand, and we'd go back to playing with our He-man or Star Wars action figures. Or M.U.S.C.L.E.s. Thus, my introduction to RPGs didn't come at the hand of that ubiquitous system, rather Chris Thunderberg's copy of a new game called Warhammer Fantasy Roleplay.



I was fascinated from the first moment I held it in my hands. Though raised on a steady diet of Arthurian legends, fairy tales, and even Tolkien, I'd never encountered anything like this. It was visceral, Germanic, dark and fascinating. The book was dripping with illustrations, violent and full of black humour. A whole new world rested between those pages. Once, once, I convinced Chris to let me borrow the book overnight. I still remember reading that introductory story on the first few pages, as a group of adventurers encountered lizardmen in chasms beneath the earth. Chris would run small adventures for us during the lunch hour at school, beneath an old tree in the far corner of the school yard. We coudln't use dice, because they weren't allowed by the teacher for some reason, but we didn't need any, it was just a "choose your own adventure" taking place in our shared imagination. I still recall my first character: "Redbolt", a pit fighter (I wanted to play a Chaos Warrior after seeing the illustration of one fighting a Jabberwocky in the book, but Chris said I couldnt be one of those until I got to a much higher level).

From then on I launched a steady campaign of pestering my mother for a copy of the book. The problem was the closest store that sold that sort of thing was about an hour's drive away. And my mom was not the type to go out of her way for such nonsense. But, my ability to be annoying eventually prevailed. The store was located on the top floor of a small building, once probably a small apartment building, but now converted into a sort of mini-mall. A used bookstore took up most of the first floor. Up some wooden stairs that had forgotten what varnish was several decades prior, at the back of a old, musty hallway, across from a small shop selling goth clothing and costumes, was a tiny room, largely taken up by a gametable in the middle. Bookcases lined one wall, packed with gamebooks and boxes, while 2 other walls were lined with various miniatures, as well as bags of dice. A stuffed dragon adorned the counter with an archaic register. The man behind it was an older fellow, with a grey beard, who eyed us somewhat suspiciously. A mother and her young child was not a welcome site in gaming shops in those days, though when she explained to him what we were looking for, he seemed to get in better mood. No random tourist was I , looking for Teddy Ruxpins or Cabbage Patch Dolls.

Of course, I didn't wait for him to provide directions, my eyes locked in on the spine of the book within moments of entering, and I feverishly ripped it from the shelf, clasping it in joy. I then wandered in amazement taking in as much as I could of the other products around the place before my mother's patience wore thin. The man helpfully explained to my mother that I would need certain dice, and he provided a small felt bag to go with them. I tried to convince her to let me get a miniature as well, but she said something about another parent (Chris's mom I think) warning her about lead, and I didnt want to push my luck that day. But the man behind the counter slipped a copy of a Ral Partha catalogue into the bag for me, and gave me a wink.

I have no further memory of that week, as I was lost in that book.
 

Mankcam

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British fantasy solo-gamebooks were my first introduction, primarily the 'Fighting Fantasy' series

1581152367040.png1581152526525.png1581152548763.png

Closely followed by the first group-play 'Fighting Fantasy' rulebook (pre-Dungeoneer/AFF)

1581152719009.png

Some kids we knew already had TSR 'Dungeons & Dragons' (D&D B/X, and I think D&D BECMI was also just hitting the shelves), but my cousin had Chaosium's 'RuneQuest'.

So that sealed my fate and I transitioned from Fighting Fantasy to RQ2. Ran and played this until Iron Crown Enterprises 'Middle Earth Role Playing' came out, then we went with that for a bit, until we started alternating the systems.

We solidly played RQ and MERP for almost a decade :thumbsup:

1581153071097.png 1581154584940.png

After this we branched into other games, took a break, tomcated around, had families, and then returned to the hobby
The rest is history...
 
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The Butcher

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Haven’t we had a similar thread already? Ah well.

I’d seen people game during recess at my school but they were dicks (as middle schoolers are wont to be) and never let me join in.

When a local news magazine ran a feature on tabletop RPGs my interest was stoked and I persuaded my old man to get me a copy of the 1991 “black box” Basic D&D.

I played the solo adventure tutorial (amazing format) then drew up my own map and ran a group of friends through it; we were hooked, of course.

So black box D&D was the first game I owned, played and ran.
 
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Mankcam

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Posted this tale before, but...

In my 8th year my family made the move from the small suburban town of Kingston, Ontario to the small rural town of Kensington, Pennsylvania. It was here that I made three close friends (not including the girl next door , Carrie-Ann, who always came by wanting to "hang out"); Chris, David, and Seth. And it was these friends that introduced me to RPGs.

I'd known "game books", sort of proto or pseudo-RPGs like Lone Wolf that I consumed along with a steady diet of Choose Your Own Adventure books. And I'd been aware of Dungeons & Dragons before that point, though primarily as a Saturday Morning cartoon and toy line. I'd had a friend in Ontario who owned the Red Box, but even though I expressed an interest in playing, he'd always say that he needed his father to "make the maps" or something or other I didn't quite understand, and we'd go back to playing with our He-man or Star Wars action figures. Or M.U.S.C.L.E.s. Thus, my introduction to RPGs didn't come at the hand of that ubiquitous system, rather Chris Thunderberg's copy of a new game called Warhammer Fantasy Roleplay.



I was fascinated from the first moment I held it in my hands. Though raised on a steady diet of Arthurian legends, fairy tales, and even Tolkien, I'd never encountered anything like this. It was visceral, Germanic, dark and fascinating. The book was dripping with illustrations, violent and full of black humour. A whole new world rested between those pages. Once, once, I convinced Chris to let me borrow the book overnight. I still remember reading that introductory story on the first few pages, as a group of adventurers encountered lizardmen in chasms beneath the earth. Chris would run small adventures for us during the lunch hour at school, beneath an old tree in the far corner of the school yard. We coudln't use dice, because they weren't allowed by the teacher for some reason, but we didn't need any, it was just a "choose your own adventure" taking place in our shared imagination. I still recall my first character: "Redbolt", a pit fighter (I wanted to play a Chaos Warrior after seeing the illustration of one fighting a Jabberwocky in the book, but Chris said I couldnt be one of those until I got to a much higher level).

From then on I launched a steady campaign of pestering my mother for a copy of the book. The problem was the closest store that sold that sort of thing was about an hour's drive away. And my mom was not the type to go out of her way for such nonsense. But, my ability to be annoying eventually prevailed. The store was located on the top floor of a small building, once probably a small apartment building, but now converted into a sort of mini-mall. A used bookstore took up most of the first floor. Up some wooden stairs that had forgotten what varnish was several decades prior, at the back of a old, musty hallway, across from a small shop selling goth clothing and costumes, was a tiny room, largely taken up by a gametable in the middle. Bookcases lined one wall, packed with gamebooks and boxes, while 2 other walls were lined with various miniatures, as well as bags of dice. A stuffed dragon adorned the counter with an archaic register. The man behind it was an older fellow, with a grey beard, who eyed us somewhat suspiciously. A mother and her young child was not a welcome site in gaming shops in those days, though when she explained to him what we were looking for, he seemed to get in better mood. No random tourist was I , looking for Teddy Ruxpins or Cabbage Patch Dolls.

Of course, I didn't wait for him to provide directions, my eyes locked in on the spine of the book within moments of entering, and I feverishly ripped it from the shelf, clasping it in joy. I then wandered in amazement taking in as much as I could of the other products around the place before my mother's patience wore thin. The man helpfully explained to my mother that I would need certain dice, and he provided a small felt bag to go with them. I tried to convince her to let me get a miniature as well, but she said something about another parent (Chris's mom I think) warning her about lead, and I didnt want to push my luck that day. But the man behind the counter slipped a copy of a Ral Partha catalogue into the bag for me, and gave me a wink.

I have no further memory of that week, as I was lost in that book.
Yeah I love Warmmer Fantasy Role Play
If I had not already been heavy into MERP and RQ back in the '80s, then this would have been the game for me.
I loved reading the books and the system. I went back later and got the WFRP 2E PoD, and it's one of my favourite games that I have never run.
I aim to fix this :thumbsup:
 

Séadna

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Traveller 3BBs as they came bundled with the Amiga Megatraveller game in a 2nd hand warehouse sale of stuff from the UK.

Shortly after got Al-Qadim without the 2E core (used it to plag a Arabian Dune like in Traveller).

About a year later got WHFRP.
 

Stevethulhu

Lose 1d20 San
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Someone got me a copy of Holmes D&D for Christmaswhen I was about 11. Which quickly became a fascination. Especially he Keep on the Borderlands. But lacking dice, as the game came with Chris that I never quite grokked or cut out, it didn't get played. Until someone else got me a copy of the Mentzer Basic Set.

A teacher saw.me reading it at school and set up a lunchtime D&D club and it all went downhill from there.

That's where I was introduced to Call of Cthulhu, MERP and edition Wars on the form of AD&D is better because it's not basic. By which time I had a counter, because I had the Expert rules.

Then came Stormbringer, RQ III, Judge Dredd, the mighty Warhammer and in the 90s, GURPS, then Cyberpunk.
 

Nobby-W

Far more clumsy and random than a blaster
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[ . . . ]
I still have the original AD&D Players Handbook, Dungeon Masters Guide, and Monster Manual that I got from him maybe in 1984--I'm guessing based on the release date of Twilight: 2000, as he was into military stuff and I think he thought it would be more like the movie Red Dawn and was disappointed in what it turned out to be.
Ah yes - Red Dawn, that classic icon of the 1980s starring Patrick Swayze and Jennifer Grey. Sometimes folks ask for a comparison between that and Dirty Dancing, and I am old enough to have seen them both. They're not all that different really - implausible premise, Jennifer Grey plays a much younger character and Patrick Swayze takes his shirt off a bit more than he really needs to.
 
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BlackWolf

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Here in Brazil we had this "unique system" called Tokyo defenders in the 90's - 00's, that initially was used to play super sentai style games, but over the course of time it changed and became a generic rules set. It's bad, like really bad, but I probably spent tons of hours playing with my friends on the garage when I was a kid. I probably will never touch the thing again, I'm not one for nostalgia.

Memory can be a fickle thing, but I actually remember the setting being interesting, is has a kind of a warp invasion thread where Is receives it's name from called "tormenta" in english Torment, and this dimensional rift open in areas of the world brining forth a legion of insect demons and plagues and acid rain and cool villains, it was a nice idea. It sure enough has momentum here to have It's own 3.5 OGL ruleset in the name of Tormenta nowdays, and last time I heard of it they did have a pretty succesful kickstarter with a new edition. It's probably the biggest setting here in the land of palm trees. Too bad I hate the publisher, you guys probably notice I hate almost all the publishers in my country and It isn't without reason, but that's a topic for another day.

Good or no, this is the book the opened the door for the hobby to me and for that I will always be grateful.
Recently I moved out and found my old books, I'm probably donating them to someone who wants to collect, but I took some pictures to post here.

IMG_20200208_070653.jpgIMG_20200208_070738.jpgIMG_20200208_070751.jpgIMG_20200208_070946.jpgIMG_20200208_070956.jpgIMG_20200208_071100.jpg
 
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