What were your RPG Firsts?

Jenx

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I've got loads of those but missed out on the Freeway Warrior stuff. Any good? We played Dragon Warriors for a little while at school but agreed as a group to go back to Becmi D&D. Maelstrom was another I pushed on them but it didn't take.



This was brilliant value for money. Try buying it for reasonable dosh now! tried it on the group and they hated a) only one kind of dice to roll and they scattered all over the place b) the silly spell names c) the fact that I had to invent a game world from scratch when they could name the streets and taverns in Specularum (from Grand Duchy of Karameikos but these days it sounds like a gynaecological tool)

So ended the groups brief flirtation with T&T.
 

dbm

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Freeway Warrior wasn’t a patch on Lone Wolf, unfortunately. I keep meaning to re-play all the Lone Wolf books...
 

Duskwight

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Mentzer Red Box in 1988 or so. I was six so I didn't understand much except that it was a more complicated Choose Your Own Adventure.

After that, Warhammer Fantasy Roleplay 1e in '92/'93 (my parents misunderstood my request for Warhammer Fantasy Battles at X-mas) and Mage: The Ascension in the same year. Getting introduced to subjective reality and postmodernism at 11 was a headtrip and I didn't understand a word of it.
 

Winterblight

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Red box D&D. A good friend moved to the USA for a brief time and when he unexpectedly returned, he brought the red box. My first purchase and game as a GM was AD&D 2e. It wasn't until I started playing Shadowrun and other games that I started writing my own adventures, until then it was all modules.
 

The Mad Hatter

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I actually also started with the Choose Your Own Adventure books. That is why I discovered that Drakar och Demoner game, because it was in the same section of the library as those books.

It was mostly Lone Wolf and Fighting Fantasy (which was renamed as Sword & Sorcery in danish).
There also was the D&D ones, but no actual D&D books. At that time the library only carried stuff that was translated.

I still have all the Choose Your Own Adventure, I bought for myself.
 

The Mad Hatter

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Drakar och Demoner is the game Trudvang legends sprang from, is it not?
Yes I think it is.
Drakar och Demoner have had several editions.
The first was a swedish version of Magic World from Chaosium.
Second and third, was mostly the same, but just a bit cleaned up.
It was from fourth edition onwards, where they changed the rules alot and ditched the setting of previous editions.
This is the editions that Trudvang Chronicles is latest off, i believe.

The translated version I have is definitely third edition, because the setting is nothing like the one in Trudvang Chronicles.
I have another game called Forbidden Lands, which uses a lot of the artwork that are in my version of Drakar och Demoner.
But what relations these things have, I have no idea off. Because the rules in Forbidden Lands is not the same at all.
 

CRKrueger

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Yes I think it is.
Drakar och Demoner have had several editions.
The first was a swedish version of Magic World from Chaosium.
Second and third, was mostly the same, but just a bit cleaned up.
It was from fourth edition onwards, where they changed the rules alot and ditched the setting of previous editions.
This is the editions that Trudvang Chronicles is latest off, i believe.

The translated version I have is definitely third edition, because the setting is nothing like the one in Trudvang Chronicles.
I have another game called Forbidden Lands, which uses a lot of the artwork that are in my version of Drakar och Demoner.
But what relations these things have, I have no idea off. Because the rules in Forbidden Lands is not the same at all.
Forbidden Lands is put out by Free League Publishing, which absorbed/merged with Jarnringen. A lot of Swedish games were first made by Aventyrsspel, but then we’re bought up by others when they stopped making RPGs. A lot of the IPs are owned by Paradox who licenses out. There’s a huge amount of cross-pollination amongst those companies, it doesn’t surprise me that artwork gets shared.
 

Moracai

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How much XP do I get for killing Santa Claus?

Reading through everyone's stories, I'm kind of impressed at how big a factor Choose Your Own Adventure books were with everyone else. They were pretty negligible for me, so it's definitely an alternate perspective.
ALL of the XP! But the downside of killing Santy Claus is that none of the characters can's get any gifts ever, and they are added to the naughty list for the rest of their lives...

Speaking of those choose your own adventure books, I had one or two of them, but didn't think much of them. I bought my son one Star Wars themed choose your adventure book, where you choose basically a class of Stormtrooper at the beginning. He probably went through it two times before it got too boring for him.
 

dbm

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It was a great time, it’s a shame that the market disappeared. I guess we’re starting to see a bit of a revival as mobile phone apps; that’s a potentially low-cost production model and game books are very well suited to playing on buses and trains.
 

3rik

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I would say that’s a pretty unusual entry into RPGs. Did you join an established group?
I think two or three members were established, or at least experienced enough to guide us and run it. I must say char gen never was that intimidating to me. It's pretty clear from the start. Our GM knew the ins and outs of the system very well, ran it smoothly.

Another unusual thing: I've never played any edition of D&D except for one one-shot of 5E Basic I played in recently. I only started checking out OSR stuff after that.
 

Tulpa Girl

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Like others I read some of the CYOA books as a kid, but they didn't leave as much of an impression on me as they did others, it seems.

Mainly because if I go to page 54 for option A and page 37 for option B, where do I go for perfectly reasonable option C that you don't list? Why didn't you list that as an option, writer?

There's a reason why I took to RPGs a few years later, and the freedom they allow, so strongly.
 
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Oculus Orbus

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I started out playing D&D with the original white box edition when I was in junior high. The first one I owned myself was the "collectors edition" white box, just before the Monster Manual appeared.
 

dbm

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I think two or three members were established, or at least experienced enough to guide us and run it. I must say char gen never was that intimidating to me. It's pretty clear from the start. Our GM knew the ins and outs of the system very well, ran it smoothly.
Joining a more experienced GM makes sense, and 3rd was definitely more accessible than 4th edition, too.

Do you still play GURPS regularly? What edition? Any particular focus in genre? Inquiring minds want to know! :grin:
 

TristramEvans

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I may have more GURPs 3rd books than any other game except FASERIP, but never played it.
 

TristramEvans

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The 4e stuff seems to be of a very different nature though - more expansions for the game rather than generally useful sourcebooks that any game can benefit from
 

dbm

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That’s a fair assessment, though the genre books are generally good advice if you want to run a game of that kind.

4e is definitely more systematic whilst 3e was more a series of specific guides.
 

João Talassa

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The first game I’ve read and run was DragonQuest, around 1983. It was a photocopy of a friend’s photocopy of the game - there were no such thing as hobby stores in Lisbon at that time. The first one I bought was Advanced Dungeons & Dragons (the 3 books orange spine edition), which I asked my father and he in turn asked a friend to bring from London.
 
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Stevethulhu

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That’s a fair assessment, though the genre books are generally good advice if you want to run a game of that kind.

4e is definitely more systematic whilst 3e was more a series of specific guides.
I used to say that 3e support was wide, but hallow. While 4e is deep but narrow.

It's an interesting difference in the way the two editions are supported and I kind of wish they'd find a sweet spot in the middle somewhere. And tame 4e and it's excesses while they were at it.
 

Arminius

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Minor complaint about RQ 1/2–the core book didn’t have enough in it to really appreciate the game. When I got it, I didn’t believe in buying modules or campaign supplements, so I really missed out on the cults and adventures.

By contrast, D&D White Box, which I started with as a player and consumer, was—well, it was confusing, but it was very clear what to do with it: create dungeons and adventure in them, then do a hex crawl.
 

ffilz

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Minor complaint about RQ 1/2–the core book didn’t have enough in it to really appreciate the game. When I got it, I didn’t believe in buying modules or campaign supplements, so I really missed out on the cults and adventures.

By contrast, D&D White Box, which I started with as a player and consumer, was—well, it was confusing, but it was very clear what to do with it: create dungeons and adventure in them, then do a hex crawl.
That is a problem with a lot of games, giving you enough of an idea of how to create scenarios or a sandbox for play. I've had trouble with games from oldies to more recent games because of this. Modules are a great way to show what game play could be like, and setting supplements help bring more setting detail without bogging down the core game book.

Did you pick up OD&D cold or did you have contact with others who had already been playing? I'm not sure OD&D is necessarily super easy to pick up cold. RQ DOES have 3 sample cults, but sadly no sample adventure (apparently there WAS going to be one but it was cut).
 

Arminius

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I watched my older brother and his friends play OD&D briefly, then they let me play a little with them. I had read The Hobbit and at least some of the Lord of the Rings so the dungeon adventure style was familiar from the scenes in the Misty Mountains and Moria. Later, a friend tried to DM, undoubtedly based on some experience with his older brother, but after a little while I could tell his way of doing combat didn’t jibe with the combat tables. I was like, “Give me that”, and took over DMing.
 

Arminius

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About whether OD&D is easy to pick up cold—it’s hard to say since so many people misunderstood it. I suspect that, even though many learned through “apprenticeship”, a lot of people were taught wrong, and a lot of people never really read the books. I had the advantage of some brief exposure—probably no more than 3-4 hours circa 1976—as well as having started playing board wargames by the time I re-encountered the game a year or so later.

The details of the game weren’t obvious—I had to puzzle over the combat tables to figure out what they meant, and the difficulties were compounded by the references to Chainmail and the use of “ for distances. But the overall structure was pretty clear, I think, as laid out in Volume 3.
 

Mankcam

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Minor complaint about RQ 1/2–the core book didn’t have enough in it to really appreciate the game. When I got it, I didn’t believe in buying modules or campaign supplements, so I really missed out on the cults and adventures.
Yeah this was an issue with RQ2, you really needed the Cults books to play it

I guess being so free-form and Classless, it was really up to what mix of Cults you were to help provide some dilineation

RQ got much better doing this, as in the current RQG you get to choose Culture, Cult, and Profession to help flesh out your character, then calculate Attributes, Passions & Skills.

Even so, I'm reluctant to kick a big RQG campaign off until we get the more extensive Cults books (currently in production), but the core book provides more than enough to start things off.

Back in RQ2 we only had Social Class, and could optionally pay for Previous Training, but that's it. I think the RQ2 core book only provided about three or so Cults (one of which was for Trolls) There was also not big emphasis on whether you even initiated in a Cult from the start, as Initiates were described as 'experienced worshippers', although there was an expectation for PCs do so at some stage, even if it just meant access to magic.

You really needed to get the RQ2 Cults books to widen the options during character generation, but to also to discover much of the setting vibe that Glorantha was known for.

I remember being pretty confused without it, and originally just tried to run a very D&D style RQ2...which didn't work all that great.

RQ2 Cults of Prax was brilliant a brilliant book, but it definately needed to be part of the RQ2 box set or just added to the RQ2 corebook.
 

Dan Davenport

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First product I owned was the X-Men Campaign set for Marvel FASERIP (Advanced). Had no idea what RPGs were or expansions/supplements were...just knew I liked the X-Men.

Turns out, I guess it was kind of a gateway.
This is much like my introduction to RPGs. I got the AD&D 1e Monster Manual because I loved monsters and because I thought that it was some kind of "in-setting" guidebook to monsters, complete with detailed stats, in the same way that the Terran Trade Authority books were "in-setting" guidebooks to spaceships, complete with detailed stats.

It wasn't until later that I heard kids using terms I'd heard in the Monster Manual and made the connection to this "Dungeons & Dragons" game that they were discussing.
 

Maximus

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I started with the Moldvay boxed set, then bought the AD&D Monster Manual and Players Handbook soon after. Would have been late 1980 / early 1981, freshman year in HS. Still have all the originals, including the dice from the boxed set.
 
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