What's a noncritically acclaimed RPG that you like?

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Ralph Dula

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Also unlike D&D of the time (or most later versions for that matter) your social class mattered a lot, and a good many professions were built around social skills, not combat or adventuring. No levels or anything much like them either.

Journeys had an issue where they expanded on it even further, which seems odd now that I think about it, as the DJ adventures in the magazine were usually combat-focused.
 

Voros

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Yokai Hunters Society is a nifty, concisely designed OSRish rpg with great art and theme.

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Not sure why it isn't more appreciated while more mediocre OSR rulesets that shall remain unnamed get all the hype.

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Gabriel

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I guess I might as well inform everyone that the sky is blue and water is wet.

I like the Strange Machine Games version of Robotech. I haven't seen any real talk of it at all online. And I get it, because I like it and even I haven't succeeded in getting it played at the table.

But when I read it, I definitely feel that a true Robotech game has finally been delivered. Its focus on skills which are approaches to problems rather than literalistic things like Pilot Veritech strikes me as exactly the kind of thing I wanted. The way mecha combat works, the background mecha go POP pretty easy and the main character's mecha have some staying power but aren't invincible stacks of HP. It's even potentially reasonable to play a non-mecha character, because the system provides some rules space so those types of characters actually have potential function.

I suppose it doesn't hurt that I have a little bit of a crush on dice pool success counting mechanics right now. It's generally speaking, a narrative style game, but it's narrative in a way that makes sense to me rather than narrative in a mechanistic way revolving around trading points around and operating under a meta economic system which determines who has the right to contribute. The system matches much more with my methodology where the system is something you use in addition to the narration, not to control the narration.

That's not to say it's an easy read. It has concepts which are odd to me and I wouldn't call it the most clearly written RPG book ever, but I do think I've got it puzzled out by paying close attention and scouring the examples of play in the book.

Sadly, I think that all the Robotech games suffer the same kind of thing I noted back when I talked about the Battlefield Press Robotech book. None of them get played. I think all the Robotech games are just being purchased so the purchaser can say they have a Robotech game on their shelf. And sadly, I can't exclude myself from that group either.
 

TristramEvans

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Alas for the Awful Sea is very fun if you like the genre "Island Realism".

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Endless Flight

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PrivateEye

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Do you think narrowing it down a bit would unhinge the system?
hmmm. I'm not completely sure - I'd need to take another look - but my default position with Pulp is for there to be fewer rather than more, skills. Maybe no more than 20-ish
 

xanther

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I tend to like Aftermath! (even though it's super-detailed combat not for me). Atomic Highway...just a great game in my mind, and in the US at least Dragon Warriors doesn't get much love but love it I do.
 

The Convenient Skill

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Games that I love which are underrated, unheard of, or seem to have been forgotten are:

Freeform Universal
Super light, almost number-less (read highest or lowest), low dice count (about 4 at max), d6 only, slight narrative push almost every roll, characters on an index card, multi-genre and probably some other things for why I love it. Currently my favourite game (for a few years now).

Fudge
I remember when Fudge was going through a renaissance, with Fudge Factor and the Fudge Forum. I'd just come out of GURPS (natural progession I'd say), and it seemed perfect. Still really like it and don't really like that Fate has stolen a lot of its thunder. I do enjoy recommending it when people stumble into problems with Fate though. Saying that, FATE 2.0 does Fate so much better.

Danger Patrol
I love the fact that those 8 roles seemingly cover all adventuring tropes (renamed for genre-savvy), to the point where I drop everything else and just use those rules. So it's not really DP, just heavily inspired.
 

Sloth_in_a_bowl

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Two games that I would like to play more of but are largely unknown are.

All For One. The ubiquity based game of hunting demons, vampires and other nasties of the night in 17th century France. You are one of the king's musketeers (or a similar group).

The edge of midnight. Noir adventures in a not Earth with a single alternative race to humans and physics based magic. America has been cut off from the rest of the world, but it's never really explained as to why. The system could easily be used for standard Earth noir adventures from the 30's to 50's.
 

Ralph Dula

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The edge of midnight. Noir adventures in a not Earth with a single alternative race to humans and physics based magic. America has been cut off from the rest of the world, but it's never really explained as to why. The system could easily be used for standard Earth noir adventures from the 30's to 50's.

I’m a bit confused, as back in the day I was told it was explained why it was cut off, and it kind of turned me off to the game.
 

Sloth_in_a_bowl

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I’m a bit confused, as back in the day I was told it was explained why it was cut off, and it kind of turned me off to the game.
Page 98 of the core rules talks about how people cannot remember any strong details about places abroad and remember it like a vivid dream. Also "though passage across the ocean is easy to obtain, it is strangely difficult to complete the journey". The whole cutoff from the world thing is weirdly vague.
Also the world is cutoff from its past which is slightly better defined. To end the great war overseas a magic bomb was used called the White Light, events before the triggering of this bomb are vague, events after are remembered. There are a group called the Few that know something is wrong but no details as to what exactly it is or what anybody could do about it.

The core book provides four different flavours of what actually happened, with the main one being that this world was created by the first atomic bomb on Earth and became a trap point for all the lost people throughout human history. The memories of earlier times and other places are memories of Earth before that person became lost. It's unsatisfactory at best.
I personally would GM the world as a bit less strange, but as written there is a big gap in explaining what the hell is actually happening to the world because it has to fit multiple theories.
 
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Ralph Dula

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The core book provides four different flavours of what actually happened, with the main one being that this world was created by the first atomic bomb on Earth and became a trap point for all the lost people throughout human history.

Ah. Sounds like the fellow who was trying to sell me on the game mixed this with his own ideas. His aspect was that everyone in the game was a copy of a real person, created by an atomic bomb that created them and the city in a pocket dimension. There were so many aspects to that I didn’t like (And I’m giving a succinct version of his, well, version) I just grew cold to the game.
 

AsenRG

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Ah. Sounds like the fellow who was trying to sell me on the game mixed this with his own ideas. His aspect was that everyone in the game was a copy of a real person, created by an atomic bomb that created them and the city in a pocket dimension. There were so many aspects to that I didn’t like (And I’m giving a succinct version of his, well, version) I just grew cold to the game.
Then maybe you should check the game yourself?
 

Ralph Dula

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Then maybe you should check the game yourself?
Sadly, he was the only person I knew interested in playing it, and he’s moved to another part of the country.
 
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