Where you from 2020 edition!

dbm

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Thought dover had it too?
I occasionally see ‘bird’s nest soup’ on the menu in Chinese restaurants and take-aways, but it’s just noodle soup, not the real thing.
 

Bunch

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It's a Yorkshireman's caviar!

Truly, whenever I get Mushy Peas outside of Yorkshire, it never quite tastes right. Down south it's especially bad, like they just poured it out of a Batchelor's tin.
So if I said "Poured out of a Batchelor's tin? Lucky you! Ours tasted like it was run through a sewege treatment plant, pissed on by a dog and served in a broken asbestos blanket!". I'd be doing a half assex Yorkshire man impression?
 

The Butcher

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It's not British cuisine. Bird's nest soup comes from somewhere in Malaysia and is an overpriced delicacy in China.

We do, however, have Jellied Eels, Smoked Eels (Delicious. Really Delicious) and more varieties of Gin than you can poke a stick at. I can also recommend Fentiman's Curiosity Cola, Thornton's Toffee and M&S Butter Mints. And then there's Patum Peperium for those who feel Marmite is lacking in flavour ...
British cuisine doesn't really deserve much of the bad rap it gets. I ate very well on my last trip there (not always typical British fare, granted, but I did have shepherd's pie, Sunday roast with all the trimmings and a ton of fish & chips, and they were all very good or great).

Gin is good but can we please talk about the beers? I was actually less than fortunate on my trip in that I didn't get to taste a mild or a barleywine (my attempts to bring home a bottle of Thomas Hardy Ale were all in vain), but I did try some porters and, somewhat to my surprise, Fuller's London Porter was my favorite. Most of them were too dry and one-note-roasty for my tastes.

Patum Peperium is awesome. I whip it up at home fairly often, it's ridiculously easy, and goes great on toast or crackers with a dram of scotch. (Gotta try it on a steak some day.)
 

Faylar

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Not as far as I'm aware. A brief bit of google-fu doesn't turn up any insight either. I'm not sure what the documentary might have been referring to.
Damn... I think I straight up remembered it wrong. The chinese soup fits my memory. I must have crossed my wires somewhere. Sorry bout that.
 

Smith

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So if I said "Poured out of a Batchelor's tin? Lucky you! Ours tasted like it was run through a sewege treatment plant, pissed on by a dog and served in a broken asbestos blanket!". I'd be doing a half assex Yorkshire man impression?
Eeh bah gum like, you've got it spot on there tyke!
 

Faylar

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That looks about how it sounded when I tried talking to Scottish people on the train

I'm pretty sure they thought they were speaking some intelligible language but it what just the hibblyjibbly nonsense you posted.
You should hear Danish... gargle eith mouthwash abd it sounds similar. :p
 

TristramEvans

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When I was in London, I found it pretty easy to live on fish & chips and bangers & mash.

But I could not eat the candy over there. It's like "we want you to have diabetes just from licking it". I thought I had a sweet tooth growing up, but I had no idea what "sweet" really was.
 

Faylar

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When I was in London, I found it pretty easy to live on fish & chips and bangers & mash.

But I could not eat the candy over there. It's like "we want you to have diabetes just from licking it". I thought I had a sweet tooth growing up, but I had no idea what "sweet" really was.
Omg have you ever been to a punjabi sweet shop? You get diabetes just looking in the shop's direction. Lol
 

3rik

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Antigua Guatemala
I spent a couple of days there back in the late 1990s during a round trip of Mexico and Guatemala, with a bit of Honduras. Loved it.

El Salvador
I was asking because my wife is from Mexico so I can relate a little. Lots of places in Mexico you can travel reasonably safely. We enjoy visiting it and do some travelling around about once or twice every three years. The only thing I hate is the flight, especially the annoying customs and boring airports.
 

Kilted Rob

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Born Yakima Washington, grew up on the North Umpqua Ranger District in Oregon from 78-89. Spent twenty-four years in New Mexico and now I‘ve been back in Oregon since 2014 living in Grants Pass.

Rob
 

Faylar

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I am seeing a lot of east coast US folks though, am I not?
 

carpocratian

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I live in a suburb of the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex in north Texas.

I was born in the town I live in right now, but only moved back here a couple of years to go. I have spent most of my adulthood living in various other towns and regions of Texas.
 

EmperorNorton

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I was born in Athens, Georgia, USA. It's the deep south, but never feels like the deep south because its a college town (the location of the University of Georgia). I'm about an hour from the edge of Atlanta.

I've always lived in Athens, partially because of family (once you have kids it is a bit harder to move away, and I had kids young), and partially just because I love the city. The food scene is good. The music scene is good. People here are generally nice (it has a lot of the Southern hospitality without as many of the downsides usually associated with the south).

Patton Oswalt did a bit when he was here and it isn't actually that off:


I've been a lot of other places for work and vacations. And while I liked a lot of those places, I think Athens will always be home. (Tokyo is amazing though. Holy fuck is that an amazing city).
 

Stevethulhu

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Well, if we're just making up silly names by haphazardly stringing together letters and adding random accent marks, I'll play along and pretend to be from Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch.
That's about half an hour from where I live. The fun part is, really that's just the name of the train station. The village is actually called Pant. The Victorians that built the railway line to Holyhead wanted to have the longest name for a train station along the way.
 

CRKrueger

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Well, if we're just making up silly names by haphazardly stringing together letters and adding random accent marks, I'll play along and pretend to be from Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch.
There needs to be a special Hell just for the person who decided how to transliterate Welsh (or any form of Gaelic).
 

CRKrueger

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Welsh makes perfect sense. It's a phonetic language when written down. Gaelic, on the other hand, makes no sense. It just has better press officers.
The language makes perfect sense. The problem is, it’s not transliterated. It uses the same set of letters as English, but the alphabet is actually different.

Someone from Japan asked to write their name in English, can’t get away with using Kanji, Hirigana or Katakana.
A Welsh person though, can get away with writing their name as Siobhan, but that’s not the English Alphabet, it’s not English.
 

Stevethulhu

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The language makes perfect sense. The problem is, it’s not transliterated. It uses the same set of letters as English, but the alphabet is actually different.

Someone from Japan asked to write their name in English, can’t get away with using Kanji, Hirigana or Katakana.
A Welsh person though, can get away with writing their name as Siobhan, but that’s not the English Alphabet, it’s not English.
First off, Siobhan is an Irish name. It's not Welsh in the slightest. Nor is it in the least bit phonetic.

But take a name like Rhiannon. Or Dwinwen. Or Delwyn. All Welsh names, all pronounced how they are spelled. They are phonetic.

The Welsh alphabet is similar to the English one, but uses certain characters to represent sounds that don't exist in English. Ll, ch, dd and ff being the most obvious ones. It also lacks a V and X. In one case because that sound is represented by f and in the other because Welsh doesn't have that sound.

Your argument is that someone speaking French, German, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Norwegian, Swedish, Finnish or any other language that uses the Roman alphabet for it's written form, shouldn't. Despite the fact that each of those languages has adaptations to suit the use of the alphabet that was originally used to write Latin in order to suit it's own specific requirements.

So really, the English alphabet is wrong. Because it's not English, it's Latin.
 

CRKrueger

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First off, Siobhan is an Irish name. It's not Welsh in the slightest. Nor is it in the least bit phonetic.

But take a name like Rhiannon. Or Dwinwen. Or Delwyn. All Welsh names, all pronounced how they are spelled. They are phonetic.

The Welsh alphabet is similar to the English one, but uses certain characters to represent sounds that don't exist in English. Ll, ch, dd and ff being the most obvious ones. It also lacks a V and X. In one case because that sound is represented by f and in the other because Welsh doesn't have that sound.

Your argument is that someone speaking French, German, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Norwegian, Swedish, Finnish or any other language that uses the Roman alphabet for it's written form, shouldn't. Despite the fact that each of those languages has adaptations to suit the use of the alphabet that was originally used to write Latin in order to suit it's own specific requirements.

So really, the English alphabet is wrong. Because it's not English, it's Latin.
When you transliterate languages with alternate sounds, using the Roman Script, you indicate as such with diacritics. If you omit them, you get improper pronunciations. For example, my last name in the old country is Kruger with an umlaut U. Kruger, Krueger, Krieger, etc are all improper ways of transliterating the name, because there is no matching sound in English. Most of the languages you mentioned are close enough to get around with some exceptions.
Gaelic and Welsh are so highly divergent, it’s like learning Greek. It’s a wholly different alphabet, that just happens to be using the same symbols.

You are correct though, Gaelic is much more divergent.
 

Stevethulhu

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When you transliterate languages with alternate sounds, using the Roman Script, you indicate as such with diacritics. If you omit them, you get improper pronunciations. For example, my last name in the old country is Krueger with an umlaut U. Kruger, Krueger, Krieger, etc are all improper ways of transliterating the name, because there is no matching sound in English. Most of the languages you mentioned are close enough to get around with some exceptions.
Gaelic and Welsh are so highly divergent, it’s like learning Greek. It’s a wholly different alphabet, that just happens to be using the same symbols.

You are correct though, Gaelic is much more divergent.
You are so wrong about Welsh. But then, what would I, who was educated in Wales, even though I'm not a Welsh speaker, know? It's the same alphabet. It has been since the 6th century AD. Here's a good guide to the Welsh alphabet.

Gaelic and Welsh are as closely related as English and German are. They are two very different branches of the Celtic language family. Comparing the two can be done, but it's not as easy as comparing Italian, Spanish and Portuguese. Or Polish, Hungarian and Russian.

They're obviously related, but they aren't the same.
 

Faylar

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You are so wrong about Welsh. But then, what would I, who was educated in Wales, even though I'm not a Welsh speaker, know? It's the same alphabet. It has been since the 6th century AD. Here's a good guide to the Welsh alphabet.

Gaelic and Welsh are as closely related as English and German are. They are two very different branches of the Celtic language family. Comparing the two can be done, but it's not as easy as comparing Italian, Spanish and Portuguese. Or Polish, Hungarian and Russian.

They're obviously related, but they aren't the same.
dd"th" (voiced) as in "the" (never the voiceless "th" sound as in "thin, e.g., "bedd"

I think it is things like that that make Welsh have a bad rap for pronunciation. THat alone could really screw up an english speaker trying to pasre a Welsh word. In English a dd rounds out the sound, like in Rudd or addage. In Welsh it apparently is just a completely different sound altogether.

So their example of "bedd" to an english speaker would be like Bed, but with a more pronounced "D" in Welsh it would be Beth with the th more like in the.

Just weird. :tongue:
 

CRKrueger

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You are so wrong about Welsh. But then, what would I, who was educated in Wales, even though I'm not a Welsh speaker, know? It's the same alphabet. It has been since the 6th century AD. Here's a good guide to the Welsh alphabet.

Gaelic and Welsh are as closely related as English and German are. They are two very different branches of the Celtic language family. Comparing the two can be done, but it's not as easy as comparing Italian, Spanish and Portuguese. Or Polish, Hungarian and Russian.

They're obviously related, but they aren't the same.
I realize I made an over generalization when lumping them, that was an error. Welsh isn’t the only language that has issues, for example the people who decided how many of the French words would be spelled in English need a strong cudgeling about the head and shoulders.

Still, while the Welsh alphabet does have mostly the same symbols, many of those symbols do express different sounds in English - to a larger degree than most of the Romance and Germanic derived languages. Gaelic even more so.

Nothing personal against the Welsh, I wish we knew more of the Brythonic languages without filtering through Roman and Germanic invaders.
 

Stevethulhu

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dd"th" (voiced) as in "the" (never the voiceless "th" sound as in "thin, e.g., "bedd"

I think it is things like that that make Welsh have a bad rap for pronunciation. THat alone could really screw up an english speaker trying to pasre a Welsh word. In English a dd rounds out the sound, like in Rudd or addage. In Welsh it apparently is just a completely different sound altogether.
It is a completely different sound. But the one that really makes English speakers trip up is ll. An aspirated 'l' which does not occur in English, sounded by placing the tongue so as to say 'l' and hissing out of one side of the mouth, e.g., "llan"

The easiest way to 'fake' this sound is with a K. But that's not quite right.

Between that and ch, a non-English sound as in Scottish "ch" in "loch", e.g., "bach", people who don't know the rules of the Welsh alphabet can really trip up.

But, once you know those rules and the pronunciations for the letters, they are absolutely consistent. Unlike English, where it's I before E. Unless we feign agreeing, but this foreign poltergeist of a rule is neither efficient nor smart- and therein lies the height of the issue. It's as if an ancient deity has deigned to influence the zeitgeist of the people. We must remove the weight of this veil from their eyes, and forfeit the obeisance of this weird and heinous rule from our science and leisure alike.
 
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