Why Did TSR Fail? Ben Riggs Seminar at Gencon 2018 & 2020

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Voros

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Ben Riggs presented this seminar on the failure of TSR at Gencon. Starts at 7:48.

Riggs is working on a book on the same subject. Seems to be taking a serious, fact-based approach that helps avoid the ‘gamer rumour-mill treated as truth syndrome’ that Peterson also admirably avoids with his more rigorously historical approach.

His starting point is the post-Gygax TSR era. Hopefully the book will be a good supplement to Peterson’s book on the hubris and backstabbing of the Gygax years.
 
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I just listened to the summary (I have trouble listening to most podcast quality talks and prefer to read) but it matches what I've read elsewhere. He implied that that it was odd for a distributor to be able to return unsold books but it's fairly common. I've read a couple of places that failure to understand hardcover fiction was the big final blow. They were making money off of fiction, so thought to greatly increase the number of books they published. They spent the money as they got it. The market didn't support that many books - printing 4x titles didn't result in 4x sales. When the returns rolled in, the money was already gone.
 
My understandung was he said it was unusual that Random House would pay TSR for their books in toto upon delivery, instead of paying them just for the sold books and returning the unsold books, which is industry standard.
 
Riggs is working on a book on the same subject. Seems to be taking a serious, fact-based approach that helps avoid the ‘gamer rumour-mill treated as truth syndrome’
I would be very interested in that. I hope they use forensic accounting if they can get a hold of the books.
...that Peterson’s book on the hubris and backstabbing of the Gygax years.
Which book is this?
 
I would be very interested in that. I hope they use forensic accounting if they can get a hold of the books.

Which book is this?
Playing at the World I believe
 
Which book is this?

51gtoijTTsL._SX348_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg
 
Playing at the World I believe

Sorry, should have been clearer, Playing at the World is amazing and has its fair share of hubris and backstabbing but the author Jon Peterson has said he's working on a history of TSR up to the ouster of Gygax.

I would suspect his excellent essay 'Ambush at Sheridan Springs' is a taste of what is to come.

Despite the title I think Peterson is quite even-handed in the 'Ambush' piece and Gygax doesn't come out looking as innocent and put-upon as he claimed (no surprise there, I think most of us are likely to tell such a story to make ourselves look as good as possible).
 
Sorry, should have been clearer, Playing at the World is amazing and has its fair share of hubris and backstabbing but the author Jon Peterson has said he's working on a history of TSR up to the ouster of Gygax.
...
I was more put off by Jon's self-loathing (of his geek side) and the undercurrent that geeks/nerds and liking D&D is inherently odd and have to be apologetic about it, as in "I like D&D, but I have a girlfriend." You know because the underlying tone is D&D players are losers, well not all of them, but most and the author is and isn't (you know because he wrote a book).
 
Hm, didn't pick up on that, but then it was a bathroom read for me, so I made my way through it piecemeal, flipping through till I found something interesting
 
Hm, didn't pick up on that, but then it was a bathroom read for me, so I made my way through it piecemeal, flipping through till I found something interesting
Fair enough. Also heard his NPR interview and he came off pretty "apologetic" for being a geek.
 
I was more put off by Jon's self-loathing (of his geek side) and the undercurrent that geeks/nerds and liking D&D is inherently odd and have to be apologetic about it, as in "I like D&D, but I have a girlfriend." You know because the underlying tone is D&D players are losers, well not all of them, but most and the author is and isn't (you know because he wrote a book).

Didn't sense that at all in the writing. He was probably just trying to be self-deprecating on NPR.
 
I can't wait to dig into this. I'm sure we've all heard Ryan Dancey's reports of pallet upon pallet of unsold D&D books going back into 1e that were sitting warehoused at TSR's Lake Geneva HQ, and how they took a quaint and moderately popular collectible dice game (Dragon Dice) over from its inventor, and ran it into the ground because hey, could be the next Magic the Gathering, let's print 30,000,000 sets and flood hobby, book, and toy stores with them, surely they'll sell. Whoops! They didn't? Better warehouse 'em!

I also recall (and I found this funny and infuriating) that when people started asking Dancey what became of, say, the 32 metric tons (or whatever; it was lots) of things like Al Qadim sets and Spelljammer modules and Birthright sourcebooks etc. that didn't get sold but were warehoused, he responded that they'd been pulped and this made so many people angry. "B-b-but you should've sold them to us! We'd have bought them for remainder prices!" God that annoyed me. Those so-called "fans" almost let TSR die because they wouldn't buy shit to support their campaigns or even their professed favorite game, and then had the gall to complain when the company was purchased and the new owners threw away the shit these people wouldn't buy.
 
I think TSR just churned out too much too fast hoping it would boost sales in the end. I don't think it's that the fans wouldn't buy it all, they couldn't. There's only so many fans and they only have so much money. And then Magic happened and I think that burned a lot of old gaming companies right out of the market.
 
I think TSR just churned out too much too fast hoping it would boost sales in the end. I don't think it's that the fans wouldn't buy it all, they couldn't. There's only so many fans and they only have so much money. And then Magic happened and I think that burned a lot of old gaming companies right out of the market.

Oh, sure, fans buying or not buying everything wasn't necessarily going to save the company but to stomp your feet and demand that something you wouldn't be bothered to pay full price for be given to you now that it's going in the bin just reeks of entitlement. Not you you, I mean, them. :smile:
 
Oh, sure, fans buying or not buying everything wasn't necessarily going to save the company but to stomp your feet and demand that something you wouldn't be bothered to pay full price for be given to you now that it's going in the bin just reeks of entitlement. Not you you, I mean, them. :smile:
Eh. I take it to mean I don't value it as high a oricp as you did but at some fraction of that price I'd give you money for it. That seems much better understood and with less antagonism now than in the past. Now we have steam sales, bundles if holding, etc that understand the market is much larger if you're willing to sell at lots of different margin levels. So initallin I sell full price and get all the folks who either gotta have it or money is no real object. They're your profit. Then as time goes on you sell to discount retailers, release PDFs etc and get all the additional revenue you can.
It does seem silly to have someone say I will pay you X and ignore that unless you have some good use for taking the loss that offsets that. Maybe you can take a loss at full MSRP and offset some profit elsewhere. But if you're having a cash flow problem then just get the cash for it.
 
I can't wait to dig into this. I'm sure we've all heard Ryan Dancey's reports of pallet upon pallet of unsold D&D books going back into 1e that were sitting warehoused at TSR's Lake Geneva HQ, and how they took a quaint and moderately popular collectible dice game (Dragon Dice) over from its inventor, and ran it into the ground because hey, could be the next Magic the Gathering, let's print 30,000,000 sets and flood hobby, book, and toy stores with them, surely they'll sell. Whoops! They didn't? Better warehouse 'em!

I also recall (and I found this funny and infuriating) that when people started asking Dancey what became of, say, the 32 metric tons (or whatever; it was lots) of things like Al Qadim sets and Spelljammer modules and Birthright sourcebooks etc. that didn't get sold but were warehoused, he responded that they'd been pulped and this made so many people angry. "B-b-but you should've sold them to us! We'd have bought them for remainder prices!" God that annoyed me. Those so-called "fans" almost let TSR die because they wouldn't buy shit to support their campaigns or even their professed favorite game, and then had the gall to complain when the company was purchased and the new owners threw away the shit these people wouldn't buy.

I've noticed that Riggs, to his credit, is not taking Dancey's claims at face value. If Riggs doesn't have evidence of something he admits it (for example, the claim that the box sets that TSR made didn't even cover their expense). Unlike Shannon Applecline he knows the difference between someone claiming something online or in conversation and an actual fact. I found Applecline's history of TSR too credulous by half.

It will be good to have someone actually dig into the actual facts of the matter and confirm what actually happened, as much as one can with all the competing claims and narratives. To me, something about Dancey's online claims have the ring of an unreliable narrator.
 
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...and Birthright sourcebooks...

Riggs tells an interesting story about Birthright and Williams in his talk. Apparently Williams was a Russian history grad and asked for a fantasy take on Russia and Birthright was the ultimate result.
 
Oh, sure, fans buying or not buying everything wasn't necessarily going to save the company but to stomp your feet and demand that something you wouldn't be bothered to pay full price for be given to you now that it's going in the bin just reeks of entitlement. Not you you, I mean, them. :smile:

From the sounds of Riggs talk, the real money at TSR was in their paperback sales and it was Random House's unexpected calling in of their debt which sealed the fate of the company.
 
I have no reason not to believe Dancey when he said there were pallets of shit in the TSR warehouse from years back. Poor inventory management probably had something to do with it as well. In retail, you have to unload shit as quickly as possible even if you don't get MSRP.

That reminds me of a story I heard about the old toy store chain Children's Palace. When they were getting ready to close (I think it was early 90s) they had the usual going out of business sales. In some stores, they found product that had been palletized in the steel for over five years. Really unforgiveable.
 
WotC does seem to have liquidated a lot of the boxed sets--you could find many cheap at Kay Bee Toys in the late 90s or early 2000s.
 
Sometimes it's more cost-efficient to junk merchandise than to keep paying for storage indefinitely. Happens all the time. Atari infamously buried nearly a million game cartridges (especially the spectacularly failed E.T. game) in Alamogordo circa 1983. As for fans somehow being required to buy product they don't want in order to support a company, that's just a bizarre and self-harming philosophy to me as it only encourages a company to produce additional crap you don't want.
 
WotC does seem to have liquidated a lot of the boxed sets--you could find many cheap at Kay Bee Toys in the late 90s or early 2000s.
Once in a blue moon I still come across ancient product still in its shrinkwrap at a game or bookstore, usually a small independent bookstore, game store, or comic book shop. Sometimes it still has the old price sticker on the front and I can pick it up for $4.99 or whatever the old 1987 price was. :thumbsup: Unfortunately it's almost always crap I wouldn't have bought in 1987 and didn't age like a fine wine so $4.99 is still more than it's worth to me. :thumbsdown: I did buy a copy of this magazine a few years ago in like-new condition at 50% of cover price (= $1.00) because (1) I liked the cover art and (2) I was curious:
Journeys.jpg
The store had stacks of this particular issue as well as a few others.
 
I've noticed that Riggs, to his credit, is not taking Dancey's claims at face value. If Riggs doesn't have evidence of something he admits it (for example, the claim that the box sets that TSR made didn't even cover their expense). Unlike Shannon Applecline he knows the difference between someone claiming something online or in conversation and an actual fact. I found Applecline's history of TSR too credulous by half.

The biggest issue with Appelcline's version is that he almost never sources anything. Even if he did just credulously report that accounts of the people he talked to, the books would be many times more useful if he actually told you who was saying what. Instead, he just gathered material from multiple sources, then stitched it together into a single story with no way to trace what part of the story came from where.

I've brought this up before in other threads, but there are few points where he says something along the lines of "Depending on who you want to believe, either A or B is true." However, as he never says who told him A or who told him B, we aren't even given the option of deciding who to believe.

It's frustrating as he clearly did so much work on these books, and it is essentially wasted.
 
I have no reason not to believe Dancey when he said there were pallets of shit in the TSR warehouse from years back.

A few years ago, during the Apology Phase of 5e's pre-development, Mike Mearls tweeted out (or maybe it was shared on FB) pictures of 70s and 80s era TSR m'dise they'd found in storage spaces "discovered" in Lake Geneva. I can't recall as there were gaming materials though.
 
I also recall (and I found this funny and infuriating) that when people started asking Dancey what became of, say, the 32 metric tons (or whatever; it was lots) of things like Al Qadim sets and Spelljammer modules and Birthright sourcebooks etc. that didn't get sold but were warehoused, he responded that they'd been pulped and this made so many people angry. "B-b-but you should've sold them to us! We'd have bought them for remainder prices!" God that annoyed me. Those so-called "fans" almost let TSR die because they wouldn't buy shit to support their campaigns or even their professed favorite game, and then had the gall to complain when the company was purchased and the new owners threw away the shit these people wouldn't buy.

Your characterization of D&D games as "so called fans" who barely supported the company is completely and utterly unfair.

Here's a product list for 1990 alone:

Legends & Lore
PHBR3 The Complete Priest's Handbook
PHBR4 The Complete Wizards's Handbook
DMGR1 Campaign Sourcebook & Catacomb Guide
DMGR2 Castle Guide
Castles, 3 Dimensional accessory
MC 5, Monstrous Compendium Greyhawk Appendix
WG12 Vale of the Mage
WGA1 Falcon's Revenge
WGA2 Falconmaser
WGA3 Flames of the Falcon
WGA4 Vecna Lives!
WGR1 Greyhawk Ruins
Forgotten Realms Adventures rulebook
The Horde, Barbarian Campagin Setting, boxed set
The Forgotten Realms Atlas
FR10 Old Empires
FR11 Dwarves Deep
LC2 Inside Ravens Bluff, The Living City
FOR1 The Draconomicon
FRA1 Storm Riders
FRA2 Black Courser
FRA3 Blood Charge
FA1 Halls of the High King
MC 4, Monstrous Compendium, Dragonlance Appendix
DLA1 Dragon Dawn
DLA2 Dragon Knight
DLA3 Dragon's Rest
DLR1 Otherlands
Hollow World Campaign Setting
DDA1 Arena of Thyatis
DDA2 Legions of Thyatis
GAZ13 The Shadow Elves
HWA1 Nightwail
HWA2 Nightrage
PC3 Creature Crucible: The Sea People
Ravenloft Realms of Terror Campagn Setting, boxed set
RA1 Feast of Goblyns
MC 7, Monstrous Compendium, Spelljammer Appendix
SJA1 Wildspace
SJA2 Skull & Crossbows
SJA3 Crystal Spheres
SJR1 Lost Ships
MC 6 Monstrous Compendium, Kara-Tur Appendix
OA6 Ronin Challenge
FROA1 Ninja Wars
LNA1 Theives of Lankhmar
LNA2 Nehwon
LNR1 Wonders of Lankhmar


That's 48 products, almost one new item released each week just that year.

Not only is it unrealistic to expect each product to have appeal for everybody but how can you expect kids, students and young adults to even keep up and be able to buy everything they find interesting? It's just not possible. By the time 3rd edition rolled around the demographic was larger, there were now more gamers in their 30s and 40s with disposable income. It's only normal that many of us were still looking for items we hadn't been able to grab the first time around. The internet also facilitated our search for info and reviews on different products that we were used to buy blindly back in the days.

Also: the idea that you'd rather buy a product at bargain price than see it be destroyed is not entitlement. It's common sense. The kind that has escaped modern society for far too long and led to massive misuse of resources including, tragically, basics like food.

I make sure to resell all my electronics, books, furniture, clothes I don't use anymore and if I can't find a buyer, I find them good homes free of charge. It's the right thing to do.
 
I have no reason not to believe Dancey when he said there were pallets of shit in the TSR warehouse from years back. Poor inventory management probably had something to do with it as well. In retail, you have to unload shit as quickly as possible even if you don't get MSRP.

That reminds me of a story I heard about the old toy store chain Children's Palace. When they were getting ready to close (I think it was early 90s) they had the usual going out of business sales. In some stores, they found product that had been palletized in the steel for over five years. Really unforgiveable.

I don't doubt much of what Dancey says is true but I suspect he claimed more than what he actually knew for a fact, for instance Riggs says that those who actually worked at TSR refute his famous claim that TSR never surveyed players/customers. To me, he has the tone of the kind of Big Talker who presents suppositions as fact.
 
Your characterization of D&D games as "so called fans" who barely supported the company is completely and utterly unfair.

Here's a product list for 1990 alone:

Legends & Lore
PHBR3 The Complete Priest's Handbook
PHBR4 The Complete Wizards's Handbook
DMGR1 Campaign Sourcebook & Catacomb Guide
DMGR2 Castle Guide
Castles, 3 Dimensional accessory
MC 5, Monstrous Compendium Greyhawk Appendix
WG12 Vale of the Mage
WGA1 Falcon's Revenge
WGA2 Falconmaser
WGA3 Flames of the Falcon
WGA4 Vecna Lives!
WGR1 Greyhawk Ruins
Forgotten Realms Adventures rulebook
The Horde, Barbarian Campagin Setting, boxed set
The Forgotten Realms Atlas
FR10 Old Empires
FR11 Dwarves Deep
LC2 Inside Ravens Bluff, The Living City
FOR1 The Draconomicon
FRA1 Storm Riders
FRA2 Black Courser
FRA3 Blood Charge
FA1 Halls of the High King
MC 4, Monstrous Compendium, Dragonlance Appendix
DLA1 Dragon Dawn
DLA2 Dragon Knight
DLA3 Dragon's Rest
DLR1 Otherlands
Hollow World Campaign Setting
DDA1 Arena of Thyatis
DDA2 Legions of Thyatis
GAZ13 The Shadow Elves
HWA1 Nightwail
HWA2 Nightrage
PC3 Creature Crucible: The Sea People
Ravenloft Realms of Terror Campagn Setting, boxed set
RA1 Feast of Goblyns
MC 7, Monstrous Compendium, Spelljammer Appendix
SJA1 Wildspace
SJA2 Skull & Crossbows
SJA3 Crystal Spheres
SJR1 Lost Ships
MC 6 Monstrous Compendium, Kara-Tur Appendix
OA6 Ronin Challenge
FROA1 Ninja Wars
LNA1 Theives of Lankhmar
LNA2 Nehwon
LNR1 Wonders of Lankhmar


That's 48 products, almost one new item released each week just that year.

Not only is it unrealistic to expect each product to have appeal for everybody but how can you expect kids, students and young adults to even keep up and be able to buy everything they find interesting? It's just not possible. By the time 3rd edition rolled around the demographic was larger, there were now more gamers in their 30s and 40s with disposable income. It's only normal that many of us were still looking for items we hadn't been able to grab the first time around. The internet also facilitated our search for info and reviews on different products that we were used to buy blindly back in the days.

Also: the idea that you'd rather buy a product at bargain price than see it be destroyed is not entitlement. It's common sense. The kind that has escaped modern society for far too long and led to massive misuse of resources including, tragically, basics like food.

I make sure to resell all my electronics, books, furniture, clothes I don't use anymore and if I can't find a buyer, I find them good homes free of charge. It's the right thing to do.
I read your 1990 list, but all I could make out was,
Ravenloft Realms of Terror Campagn Setting, boxed set
RA1 Feast of Goblyns
LNA1 Thieves of Lankhmar
LNA2 Nehwon
LNR1 Wonders of Lankhmar

:wink::grin:
 
The biggest issue with Appelcline's version is that he almost never sources anything. Even if he did just credulously report that accounts of the people he talked to, the books would be many times more useful if he actually told you who was saying what. Instead, he just gathered material from multiple sources, then stitched it together into a single story with no way to trace what part of the story came from where.

I've brought this up before in other threads, but there are few points where he says something along the lines of "Depending on who you want to believe, either A or B is true." However, as he never says who told him A or who told him B, we aren't even given the option of deciding who to believe.

It's frustrating as he clearly did so much work on these books, and it is essentially wasted.

Yeah he could have presented it as an oral history, they're all the rage in rock histories ever since Leg McNeil's Please Kill Me and then at least who said what would have been clear. I got the feeling sometimes he was quoting from forum posts but without even acknowldging the source.
 
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Your characterization of D&D games as "so called fans" who barely supported the company is completely and utterly unfair.

Here's a product list for 1990 alone:

Legends & Lore
PHBR3 The Complete Priest's Handbook
PHBR4 The Complete Wizards's Handbook
DMGR1 Campaign Sourcebook & Catacomb Guide
DMGR2 Castle Guide
Castles, 3 Dimensional accessory
MC 5, Monstrous Compendium Greyhawk Appendix
WG12 Vale of the Mage
WGA1 Falcon's Revenge
WGA2 Falconmaser
WGA3 Flames of the Falcon
WGA4 Vecna Lives!
WGR1 Greyhawk Ruins
Forgotten Realms Adventures rulebook
The Horde, Barbarian Campagin Setting, boxed set
The Forgotten Realms Atlas
FR10 Old Empires
FR11 Dwarves Deep
LC2 Inside Ravens Bluff, The Living City
FOR1 The Draconomicon
FRA1 Storm Riders
FRA2 Black Courser
FRA3 Blood Charge
FA1 Halls of the High King
MC 4, Monstrous Compendium, Dragonlance Appendix
DLA1 Dragon Dawn
DLA2 Dragon Knight
DLA3 Dragon's Rest
DLR1 Otherlands
Hollow World Campaign Setting
DDA1 Arena of Thyatis
DDA2 Legions of Thyatis
GAZ13 The Shadow Elves
HWA1 Nightwail
HWA2 Nightrage
PC3 Creature Crucible: The Sea People
Ravenloft Realms of Terror Campagn Setting, boxed set
RA1 Feast of Goblyns
MC 7, Monstrous Compendium, Spelljammer Appendix
SJA1 Wildspace
SJA2 Skull & Crossbows
SJA3 Crystal Spheres
SJR1 Lost Ships
MC 6 Monstrous Compendium, Kara-Tur Appendix
OA6 Ronin Challenge
FROA1 Ninja Wars
LNA1 Theives of Lankhmar
LNA2 Nehwon
LNR1 Wonders of Lankhmar


That's 48 products, almost one new item released each week just that year.

Not only is it unrealistic to expect each product to have appeal for everybody but how can you expect kids, students and young adults to even keep up and be able to buy everything they find interesting? It's just not possible. By the time 3rd edition rolled around the demographic was larger, there were now more gamers in their 30s and 40s with disposable income. It's only normal that many of us were still looking for items we hadn't been able to grab the first time around. The internet also facilitated our search for info and reviews on different products that we were used to buy blindly back in the days.

Also: the idea that you'd rather buy a product at bargain price than see it be destroyed is not entitlement. It's common sense. The kind that has escaped modern society for far too long and led to massive misuse of resources including, tragically, basics like food.

I make sure to resell all my electronics, books, furniture, clothes I don't use anymore and if I can't find a buyer, I find them good homes free of charge. It's the right thing to do.

I bought Legends and Lore (still love it), all those Completes, the Monstrous Compendiums, Lankmar and Greyhawk material. Must have blown a lot of money that year! Luckily I was still living at home and could afford it. Of the lot I only ended up keeping Vale of the Mage and Vena Lives! Have since picked up some of the DM Blue Books used.
 
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I don't doubt much of what Dancey says is true but I suspect he claimed more than what he actually knew for a fact, for instance Riggs says that those who actually worked at TSR refute his famous claim that TSR never surveyed players/customers. To me, he has the tone of the kind of Big Talker who presents suppositions as fact.
Dancey also seemed to massively overvalue their survey as well. When designing a product, it's a good idea to survey your customers, but a lot of the problems with 3E seemed to be with taking survey at face value. There didn't seem to a be lot of consideration for conflicting desires among customers or the fact that customers aren't always exactly sure what they want. You need to balance customer desires during a design process, and I don't think that was done enough with 3E.

Of course, 4E went the other way with completely disregarding what the customers were asking for. They seemed to finally balance out with 5E.
 
I don't doubt much of what Dancey says is true but I suspect he claimed more than what he actually knew for a fact, for instance Riggs says that those who actually worked at TSR refute his famous claim that TSR never surveyed players/customers. To me, he has the tone of the kind of Big Talker who presents suppositions as fact.
I seem to remember hearing from those who were there that TSR had pretty strong firewalls between the creative side and the business side. Dancey was looking at the business side, and, if my information is correct, may have jumped to conclusions.
 
Re: Ryan Dancey, this is the guy who was kicked out of GAMA for hacking member emails. He seems to have a habit of crapping on the past to puff himself up and sell his next thing. Then he leaves as that thing is falling apart to start another thing.
He helped start the bad idea of a Pathfinder MMO.
A list of his works.

So, I take his statements with a grain of salt.
I do remember Monte Cook or someone saying there was a bunch of stuff in the warehouse at closing and most designers grabbed a copy of everything wanted as a form of severance.

Crap. Apparently, Dancy is now at AEG. I like some of their games.
 
Re: Ryan Dancey, this is the guy who was kicked out of GAMA for hacking member emails. He seems to have a habit of crapping on the past to puff himself up and sell his next thing. Then he leaves as that thing is falling apart to start another thing.
He helped start the bad idea of a Pathfinder MMO.
A list of his works.

So, I take his statements with a grain of salt.

It was particularly funny back in the days where Dancey was at WotC, and whenever he said something utterly stupid and people pointed it out they were told to shut up because as an industry insider, he obviously knew better.

No, he fucking didn't.
 
I don't doubt much of what Dancey says is true but I suspect he claimed more than what he actually knew for a fact, for instance Riggs says that those who actually worked at TSR refute his famous claim that TSR never surveyed players/customers. To me, he has the tone of the kind of Big Talker who presents suppositions as fact.

Did TSR use the surveys or did they end up in a drawer somewhere?
 
Re: Ryan Dancey, this is the guy who was kicked out of GAMA for hacking member emails. He seems to have a habit of crapping on the past to puff himself up and sell his next thing. Then he leaves as that thing is falling apart to start another thing.
He helped start the bad idea of a Pathfinder MMO.
A list of his works.

Just as an aside, that last blog entry you linked to is an interesting window into 2011. It was still very fashionable then to talk about the immanent death of RPGs. It was that period after the post-D20 crash and before Kickstarter showed there were plenty of people out there looking to spend money on games.

It's also interesting that the OGL is listed as one of Dancey's crimes. I can see where the author was coming from at the time. Almost every RPG that I loved in 2000 would be dead within a year or two of companies chasing D20 dollars. I had a lot of bitterness about it. The OSR was also still somewhat marginal in 2011. Now that it is a notable force in gaming, I have a much harder time seeing the OGL as anything other than good.

Crap. Apparently, Dancy is now at AEG. I like some of their games.
Great. Maybe he can bring Rolling Thunder back.

What is AEG doing these days? They have completely fallen off my radar.
 
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